Tag Archive | "Dr. Ann-Marie Adams"

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President-elect Joe Biden Eyes Dr. Ann Marie Adams for U.S. Secretary of Education


By Nicole Zappone | Staff Writer

HARTFORD — President-elect Joe Biden is considering Dr. Ann Marie Adams for U.S. Secretary of Education, according to White House sources.

Dr. Adams is the only current teacher in the running. She’s been trusted by her teachers to teach thier classes since she was 10-years-old. She was an ESL teacher during undergraduate and graduate years. Now, she is a U.S. History Professor in the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities system. She is also an English Composition and ESL tutor.

Biden and his campaign staff began vetting Adams, a gifted teacher, in July 2015 when she was a White House Correspodent, according to White House sources. They began early, sources said, because Adams was not a known educator or a staunch politician. And they wanted business-minded educators like her in the job pool, according to sources familiar with the process and from Sen. Kamala Harris’ camp.

Dr. Ann Marie Adams

Adams is a lifelong learner. As an educator, entreprenuer, and exemplar, she helped revised the No Child Left Behind reauthorization bill when she worked in the late Senator Edward Kennedy’s Education Office in 2008 and 2009.

Before that, Adams was a national award-winning education reporter for several news publications in Connecticut, New York and Washington, D.C. And she was an ESL and English Composition teacher before she became a U.S. History professor at Rutgers University.

She is currently an adjunct professor in the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities system, while working as editor and publisher of The Hartford Guardian, the first hyper-local, non-profit, non-partisan news publication in New England and the tristate area.

“I’m excited about being selected to be a contender for the U.S. Secretary of Education,” Adams said. “

She also added that with her background in academia and business, as well as her local ties as an educator and journalist, this offer to serve puts her in a different and exciting category.


“I truly want to make a difference in the pre-K through 12 curriculum and restoring normalcy to schooling in America,” Adams said. “The world is watching to see how we lead during these uncertain and unprecedented times.”

As a White House Correspondent under former presidents George Bush and Barack Obama, Adams was a notable journalist and educator whose business acumen made her a star in the beltway when she was at Howard University. There, she collaborated with the President’s office at Howard University, the World Bank and the United Nations.

A spelling-bee champion, chess player and flawless writer, Adams impressed the Washington, D.C. elites and the Hartford community. Moreover, Adams has a deep knowledge of government and has solutions to intractable problems such as the achievement gap, locals said.

“Dr. Adams is an extraordinarily intelligent and brilliant person.  Her academic background is impressive.  She is extremely well credentialed,” said Connecticut Superior Court Judge Eric Coleman, a former state senator, who represented Bloomfield, Hartford and Windsor. Coleman has known Dr. Adams for about 20 years. “Her academic achievements are a reflection of her drive and determination as well as her ability.  She possesses very effective communication skills.  Also, she is an accomplished writer and speaker.”

Adams, Coleman said, is a strong candidate for the role of Education Secretary.

“In my considered opinion, Dr. Adams’ maturity and life experience combined with her natural talents, her intellectual curiosity, her discipline, her stamina and her capacity to work hard leave her well prepared to be extremely successful,” Coleman said.

Since 2004, Coleman and others in Hartford have also supported Dr. Adams as the editor and publisher of The Hartford Guardian, the first nonprofit, nonpartisan, hyperlocal news publication in New England and the tristate area.

As a veteran education reporter in Connecticut, New York and Washington, D.C., Dr. Adams lends a keen eye to education policy and practice. As a noted speaker, author and teacher, she has championed Black and Latino Studies since the 1990s to address structural inequality, including the achievement gap. In 2014, locals rally behind Dr. Adams’ belief and recently pushed a bill in the Connecticut General Assembly to make Black and Latino studies mandatory for the first time in Connecticut.

Others in the mix so far include Connecticut Education Commissioner Miguel A. Cardona, former dean emeritus of the Howard University School of Education Leslie T. Fenwick, and former president of the National Education Association from 2014 until this year: Lily Eskelsen García.

Cardona, Garcia and Fenwick’s rabid supporters, including former Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra and Sen. Chris Murphy, have been invading Adams’ privacy since 2014 to sabotage and maim her with unorthodox devices.

The experience has left Adams wondering whether other candidates were approached this way during the vetting process. That’s because the effort to sabotage included identity theft and fraud to discredit Adams as a strong candidate for Education Secretary.

So far, Hartford Police Chief Jason Thody, Assistant Police Chief Rafael Medina and Commissioner of the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection James Rovella have been notified about proper and adequate security for Adams until the Biden-Harris transition team selects finalists.

Additional reporting by Gordon Shirley.

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Historian to Discuss First Black Female Abolitionist


HARTFORD – June is Caribbean-American Heritage Month. And in celebration of Caribbean-American Heritage Month, Dr. Ann-Marie Adams will hold a discussion about race, gender, and education in Connecticut at the Avon Public Library on June 30.

 
Dr. Adams’ talk entitled Maria Stewart: Alchemy of Race, Gender, and Education in Antebellum Connecticut, will begin at 6 p.m. in the Library’s conference room at 281 Country Club Road in Avon, CT.

 
Adams, a historian and journalist, will also discuss the contours and complexity of the long Civil Rights Movement in Connecticut, which catapulted Maria Stewart to fame in the 1800s. Stewart was the first black, female abolitionist, a contemporary of Frederick Douglass.

 
She was also the first black woman to give a public speech in America.

 
She was also known for giving the first speech before a mixed audience of men and women. In the 1800s it was not proper for women—black and white—to speak before an audience with men.

 
And unbeknown to many, Stewart was from Connecticut.

 
A Caribbean-American, Dr. Adams said she is delighted to share this hidden history with the public.

 

 

Stewart has been heralded by many black feminists, but she does not get the attention of Frederick Douglass or Harriett Tubman.

 
Stewart was born in the West Indies.

 
For more information, call 860-403-0055.

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Hartford Group Honors Women Who ‘Walk Worthy’


HARTFORD —  In an effort to recognize and celebrate the accomplishments of women, who impact the Greater Hartford community,  Walk Worthy Brands will award four “walk worthy” awards at the Passing the Torch Brunch on Saturday at Central Connecticut State University.

The awardees are Dr. Ann Marie Adams, a historian and founder of  the first nonprofit, nonpartisan, hyper-local news site, The Hartford Guardian, in Connecticut in 2002. Adams is also a race and education contributor at The Washington Post blogs: The Root.com and The RootDC. Marilyn Calderon, Executive Director of Connecticut Parent Power, Tracey “Mind Evolution” Caldwell, a spoken word artist, and Nicole Locario, a folk dancer with Island Reflections Dance Troupe. The event is scheduled to begin at 11:30 a.m. on Sept. 29 at CCSU’s Institute for Techonology and Business, 185 Main St., New Britain.

The Passing the Torch Brunch was founded by Hartford native, Daemond Benjamin, who use as his guide a biblical phrase from Ephesian 4 verse 1: “I therefore the prisoner of the Lord beseech you that you walk worthy of the vocation with which you are called.”

Many of the awardees, he said, are walking worthy daily and empowering the community.

“We felt it was important to acknowledge the many unsung SheRoes in our community. The honorees embody the best our tradition and their works cover the span of journalism, activism, and performing arts,” Benjamin said.

The event will include performances by local artist, a keynote address by Rahael Tesfamariam of Urban Cusps and the Washington Post’s RootDC, as well as West Indian and Southern style cuisine.

Tickets are $25. For more information, visit WalkWorthyBrands.com/events, email walkworthybrands@gmail.com, or call 860.881.8594.

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Dr. Ann-Marie Adams To Discuss “Origins of Sheff v O’Neill”


HARTFORD –- Dr. Ann-Marie Adams will give a talk about her upcoming book based on her dissertation, “Sheff v. O’Neill: The Troubled Legacy of School Segregation in Connecticut.” The fist of its kind scholarship is ground-breaking research with a new theory about segregation and was published in 2010

The event will include a talk distilled from her dissertation while at Howard University. Her dissertation, Sheff v. O’Neill: The Troubled Legacy of  School Segregation in Connecticut, was published in 2010 and is the first serious scholarship that examines the full arc of the socio-political history of blacks in Connecticut from colonial period to the twentieth century. This is also the first published work about black education in Connecticut.

The discussion will be on Thursday, July 28 from 12: 10 to 1: 50 p.m. at the Downtown Hartford Public Library’s Café Space.

The book talk is a part of the library’s Novel Destinations, a summer reading program for adults.

Participants borrow books, audio books, and magazines, read them, and then complete and submit an entry card for each item read. The more someone reads the more chances that person has a chance to win prizes.

Over the summer, area authors, including Adams, will read from and discuss their books, or upcoming books, on Thursdays, June 30 through August 25, from 12:10-12:50 p.m., at the Downtown Branch, in the Café Space on the Main Floor.

Attendees are invited to bring their lunches and the Library will provide beverages. Each time that someone attends, he/she will receive an entry for the Library’s adult summer reading program, Novel Destinations, prize drawing.

Dr. Adams is a postdoctoral associate at Rutgers University’s Center for Historical Analysis. She teaches Twentieth Century U.S. history.

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Hartford Library Kicks Off Summer Reading Program


HARTFORD — The Hartford Public Library kicked off it’s summer reading series on Thursday at the downtown branch on Main Street with Sandra Rodriguez Barron (shown in featured photo).

Novel Destinations is the theme of Hartford Public Library’s 2011 summer reading program for adults. Participants borrow books, audiobooks, and magazines, read them, and then complete and submit an entry card for each item read. The more someone reads the more chances that person has a chance to win prizes. Residents should visit any of the Library’s 10 locations for more information.

Over the summer, area authors, including The Hartford Guardian‘s Ann-Marie Adams, will be reading from and discussing their books or upcoming books on Thursdays, June 30 through August 25, from 12:10-12:50 p.m., at the Downtown Branch, in the Café Space on the Main Floor.

Attendees are invited to bring their lunches and the Library will provide beverages. Each time that someone attends, he/she will receive an entry for the Library’s adult summer reading program, Novel Destinations, prize drawing.

All author events from 12:10-12:50 p.m. unless otherwise noted.

June 30 – Steve Liskow

July 7 – Patricia Sheehy

July 14 –Judith K. Ivie

July 21 – Okey Ndibe

July 28 – Dr. Ann-Marie Adams

August 4 – Silvio Support and Anthony Riccio

 

August 11 – José Garcia

August 18 – Judith Kappenman

August 25 – Cindy Brown Austin

Events are free and open to the public. If special accommodations to participate in an event are required, please contact Access Assistance at 860-695-6365 or TTY 860-722-6890, two weeks prior to the event.

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Dr. Ann-Marie Adams to Speak at Otis Library About Sheff v. O’Neill, Her Book


NORWICH — Historian Dr. Ann-Marie Adams will present a Women’s History book talk at Otis Library on March 10.

The event will include presentation about Sarah Harris, a chapter distilled from her dissertation, while at Howard University. Her dissertation, Sheff v. O’Neill: The Troubled Legacy of  School Segregation in Connecticut, 1946-1996 was published in 2010 and is the first serious scholarship that examines the full arc of the socio-political history of African Americans in Connecticut from the colonial period to the twentieth century.

The program, “Sarah Harris: Courage and Commitment in the Quest for ‘a Little More Learning'” will begin at 6 p.m. promptly.

Her talk on Thursday will also detail the Quaker teacher, Prudence Crandall, and her students’ fight against the prevailing racist sentiment of antebellum Connecticut after she opened the first school for black women in 1833. After a nationwide search in catalgoues and databasses, there was no published material on Sarah Harris except Adams’ dissertation and subsequent conference paper. 

Crandall’s courage is heralded across the nation and inspired a museum in Canterbury, Conn.  But the courageous act of Harris, her first black student to integrate an all-white boarding school, is rarely examined, or heralded in public, Adams said.  In her presentation, the journalist and historian will discuss the role of Harris, the young black girl, who dared to ask for a “little more” education in the ongoing quest for citizenship.

Adams’ presentation is also the first to examine race, gender and class in antebellum Connecticut and the complex but simple relationship between two women: Crandall and Harris.

This program is free and open to the public.

For more information, please call the Otis Library at (860) 889-2365, ext. 128 or call The Haartford Guardian at 860-249-1053.





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