Archive | West Hartford

Hartford Locals Return McCrory to Legislature, Gave Victory to New Registrar


HARTFORD — Still waiting for polls to tallying the final count in Hartford but a few wins are clear.

Sen. Doug McCrory, D-Hartford on Tuesday ran unopposed for the senatorial seat in Greater Hartford. He got up to 871 votes in District 3 alone. Overall, the final victory count was 29, 064.

McCrory, who represents Bloomfield, Hartford and Windsor, managed to eliminate all the opposition in Greater Hartford, according to sources. y.

At closing, the Blue Hillls Avenue resident garnered enough votes in District 3 to be declared the winner. There was not even a write-in candidate.

One individual was posed as a challenger in 2014. A storm cloud rolled into her life after someone approached her to run. She wasn’t pumped to run. But McCory and his wife Foy Smith orchestrated a coup on her life using public office, sources said. Others joined in the fray for political reasons linked to nativism.

Although, the kerfuffle was tied to the national political scene,  locals dove into the woman’s life to make sure she did not challenge McCrory or Democratic State Rep. Brandon McGee, sources close to the woman said. Also, Sasha Allen, Shawnda Barlow, Tiffany Cousar, Janice Flemming, Annett Shack, and other local natives ensured McCrory’s victory by suppressing voters of West Indian descent.

In District 1, John Fonfara, D-Hartford at press time garnered 63 percent of the vote or 19,730.

Congressman John Larson was declared a winner in the 1st District in Greater Hartford

In other local races, Giselle “Gigi” Felciana ran as a Democrat for registrar of voters and garnered 24, 425 votes. Vaness Garay-Jackson ran as a Republican and cobbled 3, 040. Her challenger got 17 in District 3 alone.

The count on the presidential race in the capital city is Joe Biden and Kamala Harris was 26, 597.

Donald Trump and Mike Pence got 3, 813 votes.

Check back for final vote counts.

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Mayor Luke Bronin: Hartford in “Red Alert” Level with COVID-19


Anthony Zepperi, Staff Writer

HARTFORD — Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin held a news conference on Friday afternoon to give an update on the COVID-19 pandemic a day after state officials said Hartford is one of 11 cities and towns in a “red alert” level due to cases of coronavirus.

On Thursday, the state launched the color-coded COVID-19 alert system for every city and town in the state, showing the average daily case rate per 100,000 population for the last two weeks.

Bronin said the alert should serve as a reminder to residents that the threat from the coronavirus remains real.

“To the extent that this alert highlights the need for continued vigilance, we welcome it,” Bronin said. “This is not a time to let down your guard.”

These Red Alert cities and towns also have the option to revert from Phase 3 of reopening back to Phase 2.

Bronin said he will continue to look at the option to scale back to Phase 2 of reopening from Phase 3 but at this time does not have any plans to take advantage of that option. The mayor said the city does not have a specific metric it will look at when considering a rollback.

The red level alert is for municipalities that have a two week average daily COVID-19 case rate higher than 15 per 100,000 population, orange level alert is for municipalities with case rates between 10 and 14 per 100,000 population, yellow alert level is for case rates between 5 and 9 per 100,000 population and municipalities with case rates lower than five per 100,000 population will be colored in gray.

The mayor said the city has not seen a significant increase in hospitalizations from COVID-19. He said the cases per 100,000 population partly has to do with the amount of testing being done.

“We are currently testing more residents than any other city in the state as far as we can tell,” Bronin said.

Residents of cities deemed to be at “red alert” level are asked to limit trips outside the home and avoid gathering with non-family members.

Communities are encouraged to cancel public events and limit community gathering points and to postpone all indoor activities and outdoor activities where wearing a mask or social distancing cannot be maintained, according to the state Department of Public Health.

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Hartford HealthCare to Do COVID-19 Tests in Hartford


HARTFORD — Hartford HealthCare is relocating and expanding their testing site to the Connecticut Convention Center in Hartford.

That’s because officials are planning for an uptick in the number of COVID-19 cases. And the garage will be used to accommodate 4,000 people a day, officials said. This new site will open Nov. 9 seven days a week.

The move by Hartford HealthCare will double the number of patients tested for COVID-19.

“Testing is absolutely crucial and it’s centers like this, as we now advance really to our first winter, where this testing capability becomes absolutely critical,” said Jeffrey Flaks, President, Hartford HealthCare.

“The more quickly we know who has the virus, the more we can support them,” said Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin.

Those choosing to get tested will get thier results in about 24 hours.

Since March, Hartford HealthCare performed 382,000 tests, officials said. Consequently, some Hartford residents are concerned about the flood of patients entering the small city.

Hartford Health spokesperson Tina Varone said that residents should not be concerned about the spread of the virus due to the move to increase capacity for tests at the Convention Center. The test site will be drive through only. No one will be required to exit cars and walk around.

Hartford HealthCare has 930 mobile testing sites.

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Foundation Opens Application to Fund Artists


HARTFORD — With the onset of COVID-19, the arts is perhaps the hardest hit sector of the region’s economy, according to advocates.

That’s why the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving has announced the Catalyst for the Arts grant after a recent survey found that Hartford area arts organizations have seen more than a 60 percent reduction in employment as the public health crisis has stretched budgets to their limits, forced venues to be closed and led to the cancellation of countless fundraising events.

The program is expected to provide the tools and techniques to help the sector manage this new landscape.

The program is a strategic partnership between the Hartford Foundation, Fathom and Free Center/CO:LAB and is designed to shift the way arts organizations conduct individual operations, support each other for mutual success, and equitably cultivate truly diverse leaders that can bring the value of the arts to the center of broader community and policy dialogues.

The application to become part of the program is open to the arts community in the Hartford Foundation’s 29 town region.

“This collective capacity building opportunity is one of the approaches we are taking to support the arts sector during these challenging times,” said Jackie Coleman, senior education investments officer with the Hartford Foundation. “We look forward to the possibility of seeing not only the participating organizations transformation but their collective impact on the sector as a whole.”

“Fathom works with leaders to create conditions for unprecedented performance, and design futures that go beyond benchmarks of the past,” said Matt Reiniger, Associate Partner, Fathom. “We’re honored and excited to be a part of Catalyst for the Arts, where we’ll work directly with arts leaders to reimagine what’s possible and to create what’s needed to realize it.”

The program is seeking applicants representing small, medium, and large arts organizations of various types to participate in the program.

Only 15 organizations will be selected to participate, based on a competitive application process.

“Against all conceivable obstacles, the nature of art is to find a way,” said Richard Hollant, founder of CO:LAB and Free Center. “That’s how I see hope. I couldn’t be more excited about the opportunity to work with our creative community, to uncover all the benefits at the intersection of hope and ingenuity, and to evolve the role of art in the reimagining of our region.”

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Saint Francis Hospital Cuts Staff



HARTFORD — Many hospital workers in Connecticut will lose thier jobs.

St. Francis Hospital in Hartford and three other hospitals in the state will slash its workforce, furlough some workers and reduce hours for others.

That’s because hospital revenues have tanked during the pandemic.


In a statement, Trinity Health said most of the layoffs are administrative, “non-clinical” positions and some are workers that had been previously furloughed.


“Though there are positive signs that patients are returning for services, the organization expects the recovery to be gradual, and there are many unknowns, with the possible resurgence of the virus and the country’s economic recovery,” the statement said.


Trinity Health, which administrates St Francis and other hospitals including Mout Saini, said the cuts will be in the first quarter of its fiscal year on July 1.

Trinity Health also has said it planned to reduce the compensation of its executives; freeze all capital expenditures except those necessary to fight the pandemic and significantly reduce “discretionary” spending.

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Gov. Ned Lamont: Some Businesses to Reopen


By Thomas Nocera, Staff Writer

HARTFORD — Three months after the global pandemic of the coronavirus, Gov. Ned Lamont on Monday scheduled several type of businesses to reopen.

According to Lamont’s office, barbershops, beauty salons and several kinds of retail stories will be opened in phase one of the plan, but they will follow specific rules as described to stave off the spread of COVID-19.

The first phase – which includes restaurants; offices; hair salons and barbershops; retail stores; and outdoor museums and zoos – is currently planned to take effect beginning May 20.

The governor stressed that the decision to reopen during this phase rests with each individual business owner – they are not required to open if they do not choose.

The protocols were developed by Lamont, members of his office, and the Department of Economic and Community Development, in consultation with legislators and recommendations made by the Reopen Connecticut Advisory Group, which consists of several of the state’s leading medical experts and representatives of several business and industry groups.

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St. James Episcopal to Host the Vienna Boys’ Choir


WEST HARTFORD – The world-famous Vienna Boys’s Choir will give only one performance in Connecticut during its spring concert tour in the United States.

The Austrian ensemble will perform on April 2 at 7 p.m. at St. James’s Episcopal Church at 1018 Farmington Ave in West Hartford.

Artistic Director of Concerts at St. James Vaugh Mauren said the church is “extremely fortunate that the Vienna Boys Choir has included West Hartford in their 2019 tour.”

That’s because the choir gives about 300 concerts per year in locations across the world and is in high demand, he said.

“This concert is a rare opportunity for music lovers in the Greater Hartford region to have one of the finest boys choirs in the world,” Mauren said.

The Vienna Boy’s Choir, which traces its history to 1498, is known for their lively singing style and beautiful tone. Before 1918, the choir sang exclusively for the imperial court, at mass, concerts, private functions and on state occasions.

Mauren said that the choir will be heard in the natural acoustic of the church sanctuary that is “much more suited” to the boys’s voices than a larger venue.

The program will included the famous “O Fortuna” from Orff’s Carmina Burana, Renaissance and Baroque choral classics and selections from Broadway musicals. It will also end with favorite Strauss polkas and waltzes, including “The Beautiful Blue Danube.”

Tickets for the Vienna Boys Choir’s concert are priced from $20 to $65 and can be purchased here.

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Sen. Beth Bye to Resign to Join Ned Lamont’s Administration


By Fran Wilson, Staff Writer

HARTFORD — State Sen. Beth Bye will resign to take a job with Gov. elect Ned Lamont’s administration.

Lamont picked Bye to lead Connecticut’s Office of Early Childhood, which was created in 2013. She will help to develop a cohesive early childhood care and educational system.

“Beth Bye has devoted her entire professional career to helping to build a more progressive and equitable early childhood system in which all children, regardless of their parents’ socio-economic status, can grow, learn and develop,” Lamont said. “It’s clear that the formative early childhood years are jey to providing children a solid educational base and platform, and I know Beth is the best person to take the helm of this critical agency.”

Bye is a Democrat who represents the 5th Senate District, which includes West Hartford, Bloomfield, Burlington and Farmington. She was elected to the House of Representatives in 2007 and then moved to the Senate in 2011. There will be a special election to fill Bye’s seat because she was reelected in November.

Currently, Bye is the executive director of Auerfarm, a Bloomfield-based community farm that hosts 15,000 student trips annually. Prior to that, Bye led Great by 8, a community partnership to develop a program that supports optimal health and educational outcomes for children ages birth to eight. She also worked as Early Childhood Director at the Capitol Region Education Council and was Director at Trinity College Community Child Center and the University of St. Joseph School for Young Children.

She will earn $155,000 in her new job.

“I am grateful to begin this next chapter in my career, leading an agency I helped to spearhead and create,” said Bye. “Connecticut’s children—all of them—represent  the future of our state, and deserve to have the tools and support necessary to develop, grow and thrive.”

 

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West Hartford Magnet School Awarded Blue Ribbon


By Fran Wilson, Staff Writer

HARTFORD — A West Hartford school was awarded a 2018 National Blue Ribbon by the U.S. Department of Education.

The University of Hartford Magnet School was one of five schools recently awarded blue ribbons for their high academic performance or progress in closing the achievement gap between white and black, wealthy and poor.

“We congratulate these schools and their teachers, students and families for their collective efforts to nurture positive school communities,” said Gov. Dan Malloy. “They are all helping to shift the growing possibilities for our next generation in a positive direction.”

The University of Hartford Magnet School is operated by the Capitol Region Education Council. It serves pre-kindergartner through grade 5 students from more than 30 Connecticut towns. The school’s theme is “Learning through Multiple Intelligences.”

University of Hartford Magnet School Principal Tim Barber attributes the school’s success to the “close relationships among teachers, staff and families.”

The other schools awarded a blue ribbon were Forest School in West Haven, West School in New Canaan, Haddam-Killingworth High School in Regional School District 17 and St. Mary’s School in Simsbury.

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Reading Program Seeks Volunteers


WEST HARTFORD — Looking to work with children?

Volunteers are needed to read to at risk students in kindergarten through sixth grades in Bloomfield, Hartford, Manchester, New Britain and West Hartford. This is a part of the Children’s Reading Partner’s Elementary Express program that offers enrichment opportunities for local children at a public library in Bloomfield.

To become a reading mentor, volunteers must attend a training session, submit an application and select a 30-minute-per-week time slot to read to a child. Volunteer time slots are available during the school day, after school or in the evening.

Prospective volunteers may attend any of the following training sessions: Thursday, Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. at Congregation Kol Haverim, 1079 Hebron Ave., Glastonbury; Monday, Sept. 17 at 7 p.n. at the Community Services Building, 333 Bloomfield Ave., West Hartford; and Sept. 20 at 1 p.m. at the Community Services Building, 33 Bloomfield Ave., West Hartford.

To learn more or to sign up for a training session, contact Children’s Reading Partners at read@jewishhartford.org or call 860-236-7323.

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