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President-elect Joe Biden Eyes Dr. Ann Marie Adams for U.S. Secretary of Education


By Nicole Zappone | Staff Writer

HARTFORD — President-elect Joe Biden is considering Dr. Ann Marie Adams for U.S. Secretary of Education, according to White House sources.

Dr. Adams is the only current teacher in the running. She’s been trusted by her teachers to teach thier classes since she was 10-years-old. She was an ESL teacher during undergraduate and graduate years. Now, she is a U.S. History Professor in the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities system. She is also an English Composition and ESL tutor.

Biden and his campaign staff began vetting Adams, a gifted teacher, in July 2015 when she was a White House Correspodent, according to White House sources. They began early, sources said, because Adams was not a known educator or a staunch politician. And they wanted business-minded educators like her in the job pool, according to sources familiar with the process and from Sen. Kamala Harris’ camp.

Dr. Ann Marie Adams

Adams is a lifelong learner. As an educator, entreprenuer, and exemplar, she helped revised the No Child Left Behind reauthorization bill when she worked in the late Senator Edward Kennedy’s Education Office in 2008 and 2009.

Before that, Adams was a national award-winning education reporter for several news publications in Connecticut, New York and Washington, D.C. And she was an ESL and English Composition teacher before she became a U.S. History professor at Rutgers University.

She is currently an adjunct professor in the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities system, while working as editor and publisher of The Hartford Guardian, the first hyper-local, non-profit, non-partisan news publication in New England and the tristate area.

“I’m excited about being selected to be a contender for the U.S. Secretary of Education,” Adams said. “

She also added that with her background in academia and business, as well as her local ties as an educator and journalist, this offer to serve puts her in a different and exciting category.


“I truly want to make a difference in the pre-K through 12 curriculum and restoring normalcy to schooling in America,” Adams said. “The world is watching to see how we lead during these uncertain and unprecedented times.”

As a White House Correspondent under former presidents George Bush and Barack Obama, Adams was a notable journalist and educator whose business acumen made her a star in the beltway when she was at Howard University. There, she collaborated with the President’s office at Howard University, the World Bank and the United Nations.

A spelling-bee champion, chess player and flawless writer, Adams impressed the Washington, D.C. elites and the Hartford community. Moreover, Adams has a deep knowledge of government and has solutions to intractable problems such as the achievement gap, locals said.

“Dr. Adams is an extraordinarily intelligent and brilliant person.  Her academic background is impressive.  She is extremely well credentialed,” said Connecticut Superior Court Judge Eric Coleman, a former state senator, who represented Bloomfield, Hartford and Windsor. Coleman has known Dr. Adams for about 20 years. “Her academic achievements are a reflection of her drive and determination as well as her ability.  She possesses very effective communication skills.  Also, she is an accomplished writer and speaker.”

Adams, Coleman said, is a strong candidate for the role of Education Secretary.

“In my considered opinion, Dr. Adams’ maturity and life experience combined with her natural talents, her intellectual curiosity, her discipline, her stamina and her capacity to work hard leave her well prepared to be extremely successful,” Coleman said.

Since 2004, Coleman and others in Hartford have also supported Dr. Adams as the editor and publisher of The Hartford Guardian, the first nonprofit, nonpartisan, hyperlocal news publication in New England and the tristate area.

As a veteran education reporter in Connecticut, New York and Washington, D.C., Dr. Adams lends a keen eye to education policy and practice. As a noted speaker, author and teacher, she has championed Black and Latino Studies since the 1990s to address structural inequality, including the achievement gap. In 2014, locals rally behind Dr. Adams’ belief and recently pushed a bill in the Connecticut General Assembly to make Black and Latino studies mandatory for the first time in Connecticut.

Others in the mix so far include Connecticut Education Commissioner Miguel A. Cardona, former dean emeritus of the Howard University School of Education Leslie T. Fenwick, and former president of the National Education Association from 2014 until this year: Lily Eskelsen García.

Cardona, Garcia and Fenwick’s rabid supporters, including former Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra and Sen. Chris Murphy, have been invading Adams’ privacy since 2014 to sabotage and maim her with unorthodox devices.

The experience has left Adams wondering whether other candidates were approached this way during the vetting process. That’s because the effort to sabotage included identity theft and fraud to discredit Adams as a strong candidate for Education Secretary.

So far, Hartford Police Chief Jason Thody, Assistant Police Chief Rafael Medina and Commissioner of the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection James Rovella have been notified about proper and adequate security for Adams until the Biden-Harris transition team selects finalists.

Additional reporting by Gordon Shirley.

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Donate Today and Support The Hartford Guardian



HARTFORD
— It’s that time of the year when we celebrate another journey for The Hartford Guardian as the first nonprofit, nonpartisan, hyperlocal news publication in New England and the tristate area.

The Hartford Guardian was concieved in 2002 and founded in 2004. In 2005, the Internal Revenue Service granted the Connecticut Alliance for Better Communities, Inc dba The Hartford Guardian its 501 c 3 nonprofit status. Therefore, you can make a tax-deductible contribution where 100 percent of your donation can be deducted on your tax return.

In January 2014, someone attack our news publication and our editor-in-chief, Ann Marie Adams. They vandalized her home, and our office. They also stole smart phones, laptop computers, cameras, cash and other belongings. We were held by force by unknown assailants to prevent us from being productive for three consecutive years. Then the perpetrators assaulted our faces and bodies and told us not to write or speak about race in America.

It was a hate crime. More importantly, it was media suppression that demands national and international attention.

Without Adams, our publication cannot function daily. She is the founder of this coveted news organization and she helps supervise a staff of six individuals and several freelancers.

Several other nonprofit organizations used CABC, Inc dba The Hartford Guardian as a model in New England and the tristate area.

The Hartford Guardian focuses on news and issues in Hartford and beyond.

If you haven’t had a chance to donate yet, please consider making a tax-deductible contribution today.

Support The Hartford Guardian and ensure we reach our #NewsMatch goal of $20, 000.

Click the link below or cut and paste it in your browser:

https://t.co/gCI3OY2vrF

The Hartford Guardian Staff

https://t.co/gCI3OY2vrF

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Eversource to Raise Utility Rate By January 2021


By Anthony Zepperi, Staff Writer

HARTFORD – Connecticut’s utility regulators said recently that Eversource Energy, which drew protests during the summer for a rate increase, will raise prices Jan. 1 to account for higher generating costs.

Unlike the increases quickly rescinded by the state Public Utilities Regulatory Authority, Eversource and United Illuminating make no money from the rate increase intended to absorb generating costs that pass through Eversource. The rates extend to June 30.

“We recognize the effect higher electricity prices can have on our customers, especially during these unprecedented times with the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and we want to help them better manage their energy use,” Penni Conner, an Eversource senior vice president, said.

Eversource has no control over fluctuating energy prices, but the utility says it offers energy efficiency programs to help customers cut electricity use.

“This is a direct pass-through cost to customers for the price of power generation, with no profit to the company,” Eversource said.

The proposed winter electricity prices are about 8.4 cents a kilowatt-hour, up from about 7.4 cents, a 13 percent increase. The average residential customer using 700 kilowatt-hours of electricity a month would pay about $7.11 more on the supply portion of their bill, Eversource said.

It would apply to customers in Connecticut who are signed up for the company’s standard service generation rate, or those not using an alternative energy company.

PURA said the new rates are less than what was issued in the first half of 2018, 2019 and 2020.

The U.S. Energy Information Agency said it expects U.S. residential electricity prices this year to average 13.1 cents per kilowatt-hour, up 0.4 percent  from the average electricity price in 2019. Its short term energy outlook in October expects wholesale electricity prices in New England to be about 33 percent higher next year, due primarily to expected costs of natural gas for power generation.

Under state law that deregulated electricity, energy companies such as Eversource bid twice a year for power supplies, award contracts to low bidders and pass along the costs to customers without markups.

In June, PURA approved higher rates based on transmission and other charges complicated by heat waves, power purchased from the Millstone nuclear plant and a pandemic that’s changing consumer behavior.

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Gov. Ned Lamont Annouces Coronavirus Relief Fund


By Anthony Zepperi, Staff Writer

HARTFORD – Gov. Ned Lamont announced that he is allocating $15 million from the state’s Coronavirus Relief Fund, which utilizes federal CARES Act money, to fund innovative workforce programs that will provide job training to more than 1,000 displaced workers in the state and connect them to high-growth, in-demand jobs.

“This pandemic has drastically impacted the lives and livelihood of so many people in our state, and these workforce development programs are being expanded so that we can provide displaced workers with the skills needed to match them with in-demand jobs,” Lamont said. “Our administration is committed to offering meaningful and lasting support to the workers of Connecticut so that our state and our economy emerge from this crisis stronger than ever.”

The Governor’s Workforce Council, with the support of the recently formed Workforce Development Unit in the Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD), will utilize the funding on 19 programs that offer participants access to supportive services, including childcare and transportation, as well as a general training subsidy and job placement services that connect participants with full-time employment.

 In selecting programs for investment, the Governor’s Workforce Council prioritized programs aligned to current in-demand jobs with strong career pathways across several industries, most notably healthcare, information technology, and manufacturing. In total, approximately 1,100 participants will receive training and employment opportunities from this initiative.

“COVID-19 has accelerated many of the changes that have been reshaping our economy,” Garrett Moran, Chairman of the Governor’s Workforce Council, said. “The money from the Coronavirus Relief Fund was an instrumental first step in not only getting residents back to work, but getting them back to work in careers that are pandemic-proof for the future.”

Kelli Vallieres, executive director of DECD’s Workforce Development Unit said the program hopes to get people back to work.

“This statewide program is a great example of how Connecticut can leverage its strong workforce partners, such as our Regional Workforce Development Boards, community colleges, and local training providers, among others, to create industry-aligned programs aimed at getting Connecticut residents back to work,” Vallieres said.

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Connecticut Journalist to Sue Halle Berry for Copyright Infringement, Media Suppression


Halle Marie Berry in a role soley based on Ann Marie Adams featured in the 1990 movie “Strictly Business.” Adams was a trained actress and a trained model, who worked as a club girl and a hostess in Manhattan and Brooklyn from 1989 to 1992. The photo was photoshopped to look like Adams. Berry, who was chubby before 1987, have been trying to cop Adams’ pretty face and slender physique since 1990, while her associates altered or distort Adams’ face with unknown devices in photographs and then stalked Adams. The photo itself does not match Berry’s actual face in the movie no is an exact replica.
Male actor: Joseph C. Phillips. Photo Courtesy of Warner Brothers

Updated November 12, 2020 at 12:22 p.m.

By Gordon Henry and Jasmine Sanborn, Staff Writers

HARTFORDThe Hartford Guardian‘s Publisher Ann Marie Adams is expected to sue Halle Marie Berry for loss of revenue because of media suppression, invasion of privacy, theft of services and copyright infringement.

Consequently, Adams was forced to alert people about this kind of media suppression that has been expertly done in secret for years by Berry and her associates. A clandestine operation to suppress local journalists, therefore, demanded attention from advocates for a strong democracy and a free press, Adams said.

This means Adams wants a divorce from Berry’s spirit that has been in her life for more than 35 years, as well as her associates who rendered injuries and financial loss to Adams and her family.

“Without Adams, there is no news publication called The Hartford Guardian. She founded an organization that employs dozens of local journalists, support staff and volunteers, who live in Hartford and surrounding areas. So this is not a personal issue. It is strictly business. It affects workers, who need a paycheck. If Berry and her friends disrupt Adams, they are also disrupting her business and her employees,” said David Williams, UConn-Greater Hartford Campus Director emeritus and a board member for The Hartford Guardian.

The recent attacks by Berry and her associates allegedly first happened on the 2010 presidential campaign and then at the White House inaugural ball in January 2013. Afterward, Adams, who now lives in Hartford, was stalked and attacked again in 2014 at her townhouse in Avon, CT. Adams was clueless about Berry’s unorthodox methods of appropriating her likeness and theft of services until President Barack Obama intervened on Adams’ behalf.

Adams, an award-winning journalist and historian, claimed that Berry, 53, has been invading her privacy and appropriating her likeness and biography since they were both selected for the 1991 movie “Strictly Business.” The use of Adams’ likeness is strategic in movies such as “Bulworth” and “Monster’s Ball.” All three films appropriated almost all of her biography at each given time period.

It’s a Caribbean-American look. More specifically, it’s Adams’ look and style, said Dr. Karren Dunkley, a Jamican Diaspora Northeast Representative. Berry was born with a different phenotype than Adams, who is light-skined and akin to the model, Karen Alexander, when she began modeling in 1990. Adams came to America three years before in 1987, before The Cosby Show spin off began in 1987 and ran until 1993. It was indeed a different world for Adams, not for the cast and characters in the television comedy series: “A Different World.”

“This was the beginning of intense racism and xenophobia in the country,” Williams said.

Adams was an immigrant from Jamaica in 1987, coming to America as a whiz kid in chess, a brilliant writer and spelling bee champion. Soon afterward, she was a trained method-actress and a trained model. She was featured in two scenes as Ann Marie Rose in the 1991 film, “Strictly Business.” In between takes, Berry approached the director to express her dissatisfaction about Adams presence in the movie because Adams was considered competition and prettier than Berry in New York. Also, Berry had slimmed down to look like Adams for the role that launched her career.

Above: Halle Berry before she entered the Miss Ohio pageant in 1986.

Moreover, Berry and her associates have frequently interrupted Adams’ career since Adams was editor-in-chief of The Kingsman, a newspaper at Brooklyn College. They continued to interrupt Adams, while she was at the Times Herald Record in New York and The Hartford Courant in CT, where she won a national award for first place in education reporting in 2001.

Ann Marie Adams was Ann Marie Rose in this club scene before Berry approached her on the set to express herself about Adams’ presence in the movie because Adams was competition during the 1990s acting and modeling scene in New York

And the disruption continued into 2014, Adams said. Berry and her associates, some of whom traveled to Connecticut, staged adverse experiences for six years, while Berry auditioned, rehearsed and promoted “John Wick 3, Parabellum.” The media suppression was primarily to thwart the news story about Berry’s invasion, according to Hollywood insiders, and to prevent Adams’ from promoting her accomplishments with her own facial features in pictures. Instead, Berry appropriated Adams’ likeness,and tried to change it drastically on camera at the White House in 2015. This need to change Adams’ face when a model takes a semblance of it has been going on since Alexander was on the cover of Mademoiselle in 2001, said Adams, who is the same phenotype and body type as Alexander. Berry wanted to change the beauty and sexual appeal Tupac Shakur liked on Adams when he met her on the set of “Strictly Business” and because of that invited her on the set of “Juice.”

Ann Marie Adams at the White House in 2015. The photo was slightly distorted.

Since her first movie, Berry has been appropriating Adams’ likeness, not in all movies or all scenes, but enough times for Adams to be concerned when she saw a semblance of her face on screen.

“Berry just didn’t want to give up playing that character based on me in Strictly Business,” Adams said. “I had to wait years before someone gave Berry a reality check: The movie is based solely on me. So clearly this matter of collecting what I’m owed is strictly business.”

Sources said the scarilegious move by Berry and others was designed to disturb Adams and, of course, to gain financial success. Because Berry used Adams’ unique look, while she had others changed Adams’ perfect face and body with unorthodox methods, this was considered human rights abuse and economic oppression. According to Attorney Amal Clooney, the perpetrators of human rights abuse should face justice for thier crime.

Berry and her associates caused about $30 million in damages to Adams’ waist, breasts, perfect white teeth, legs, hands, eyes, and vocal chords to stop her from appearing on NBC’s “The Voice” in 2014.

The insanity was aided and abetted by several U.S. Secret Service agents, who the perpetrators enabled as they stealthily attacked Adams and her family during an investigation. Afterward, they were fired.

“It was also unadulterated xenophobia by people, who thought they would get away with this mess,” said Adams, who was born in Jamaica and is now a U.S. citizen. “Berry and associates were out of touch with reality and mired in avarices, a greed for wealth.”

Top Photo : Ann Marie Adams on the set of Strictly Business: Right Column: Halle Berry in 1992 movie “Bomerang”: Opposite Berry (bottom): Adams covering the White House in 2015 and Berry (bottom right) in the movie, 1998 “Bulworth” Berry invaded Adams’ privacy and appropriated Adams’ likeness for 30 years before Adams was informed about this crime of the century by a well-known celebrity billed as ” one of the world’s most beautiful women” with Adams’ face.

Berry Cops Adams’ Face

It’s an incredible story that unfolded over the last six years. The psychology of an ugly girl, who wanted to be pretty was on display, so much so President Vladimir Putin had to intervene when Berry visited Adams in her townhouse in January 2013 with unorthodox devices. Adams has a million dollar smile envied by Berry. And the “Monsters Ball” star wanted Adams to loose her teeth.

Sources close to the White House and the Federal Bureau of Investigation said they had to reveal the depth of the depravity used on Adams and her family to hide this farce by Berry and others, including Bill Cosby. As a result of this six-year investigation, they are calling for Adams’ face not to be used on the internet with the name Halle Berry to confuse the public. This lie by Berry and her associates violates the public trust, according to Avon Police Officer Jonathan Haynes, who first broke the news to Adams, who also made a complaint to two Avon police officers on April 3, 2014: Officers Mark Vess and John O’Neill. They failed, however, to take action to arrest the suspects.

In the past, the closest, Berry got to getting an exact replica of Adams’ face was in “Boomerang” released in 1992 and “Monster’s Ball” released in 2001. The screenwriters and producers of the show used Berry to remind Adams of a former boyfriend, who slept with her on a couch after she refused to sleep on the couch for a part in a movie.

“To me, Berry and her associates were sending a message about a particular incident when I was in show business. It was disturbing to see similar incidents in other movies that featured Berry,” Adams said.

Both movies also had scenes depicting an incident with Adams and Tupac in “Juice,” a different movie set about another club scene. The producers, writers and directors on that and other movie sets have some explaining to do, she said. However, Tupac was different.He was also hanging out on the set of Strictly Business. Later, he advocated for Adams to “stay in the scene” on his movie set. He later paid homage to Adams and her braids by having Janet Jackson wear braids in the movie: “Poetic Justice.”

Now it was time for poetic justice for Berry who continued a disturbing trend that includes Berry dating men, who look similar to at least five of Adams’ former boyfriends. But Berry didn’t date Tupac. Adams did. And so during the invetigation into why she stalked Adams, Berry dated someone who resembles Tupac.

More recently, Berry allegedly used local and national allies to assault Adams’ face and body with unorthodox methods. One link to this story is Marcy Carsey, the producers of “The Cosby Show” based in part on Adams’ family. Carsey is Jewish, and so is Berry’s mother, a likely pair that has been allegedly sabotaged Adams and her family to hide the truth.

Left: Ann-Marie Adams in 1992 looks the same today and discovered that Berry was still appropriating her likeness, biography and fashion style in 2019, especially during the filming and promotion of the John Wick 3, Parabella movie in 2019. This photo, and other photos, was slightly distorted with shadows by Berry’s associates

Before becoming an award-winning journalist and scholar, Adams was a trained model and actress in New York during the 1990s. To discredit her claim, Berry and allies distorted Adams’ pictures, stole pertinent documents, albums and flyers for years. The change was mostly to Adams’ color in photographs, especially when Adams was on WFSB Channel 3 as a commentator.

Adams has a Ph.D. with distinction in U.S. History from Howard University and a Master’s degree in broadcast journalism from Quinnipiac University. She graduated with honors from Brooklyn College with a degree in journalism. She also has a paralegal certificate from Boston College. Her varied experiences and deep knowledge of city, state and federal government, as well as government and politics was used without her permission during the six-year ordeal by several intruders close to Berry–just to get a sense of how Adams look so she can appropriate the face again, as well as to “steal” her education.

Why Halle Berry Was Fired From Strictly Business…Wasn’t Reported Until Now

Halle Berry in 1986 does not look like Adams. In 1989, Berry changed her face to look similar to Adams.

Consequently, Adams is seeking justice for the many attempts by Berry and her associates to distort her face in photographs and on television, while Berry appropriated her face in movies and other promotional events since 1990. The most recent invasion of privacy in Adams’ Avon townhouse in 2014 to confiscate wardrobe used on “Strictly Business” was too egregious, said Adams, who was wants reparation.

Berry switched from her shoulder-length hairstyle to a pixie similar to Adams

Girl Interrupted!

Adams, a former English Composition professor and tutor, was confused about the motive for this kind of treachery toward her:

“One of the rules in the English language is to avoid plagiarism, copying knowledge that doesn’t belong to you. Students should always give attribution. When you mistake copying a book to copying someone’s face, you must be sued. Sometimes, Berry appropriated my face and biography like a book and without attribution,” Adams said. “That’s sinful, sacrilegious and downright sad.”

In “Strictly Business,” almost everything depicted in the movie was encapsulated about Adams’ life in Hartford and Manhattan. She was clueless until she was alerted of this appropriation by one of her former bosses in New York after he spotted Adams’ face on Halle Berry in “John Wick 3, Parabellum.”

During her rehearsals for John Wick 3, Berry used her spy devices as a real life assassin and visited Adams in her townhouse with others to attack her. Some of those individuals included friends of Meghan Markle, who also appropriated the shape of Adam’s face and Adams’ nose. Markle’s friends allegedly teamed up with Berry to use unorthodox methods to “erase” Adams’ facial features in pictures.

Berry also, through her network, arranged to have an associate, a native of Ohio–like Berry–to move to Hartford. He and others allegedly have been secretly suppressing Adams as a journalist since 2019 because Adams called out Berry and her stealth tactics to cover up her crime.

Also, former Central Intelligence Agency operatives were allegedly using unknown devices for Berry to prevent Adams from knowing this information when Adams was an intern in former Sen. Edward Kennedy’s Education Office in 2009.

When contacted, Former CIA Director and Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta said he did not authorize any 10-year investigation into any intern then or now.

“I did not authorize any project with CIA agents to watch anyone in Kennedy’s office,” Panetta said.” [I] unequivocally did not order such an investigation during the time you stated nor for that matter any other time.”

And those perpetrating as CIA operatives “watching” the crime for 35 years, are considered cowards and criminals for aiding and abetting thieves in government offices, officials said.

“I’m glad they were fired,” Adams said. “They are traitors to the country. They caused an international fiasco that demands the world’s attention.”

Therefore, Adams said: “George Nelson, the directors, and producers have some explaining to do.”

Top Seventeen Scenes in “Strictly Business” that Depict Adams’ Life as an actress, model and club girl:

  1. Adams was a hostess “with the mostess” in Manhattan and Hartford.
  2. Adams was a trained method-actress and model, while she was a hostess.
  3. Adams was a club girl and was among the fly girls chauffeured in limousines to clubs like The Palladium.
  4. Adams was dating Wayne, a stockbroker and millionaire that was button-up. He thought Adams was the girl of his dreams; Waymon Tisdale played Adams’ friend.
  5. Adams had a romantic scene on the boardwalk in Manhattan with similar outfit. Almost all the scenes had similar outfits to Adams’
  6. Adams’ friend “Alfie,” who wanted to make it big, was played by Tommy Davidson.
  7. Adams was in an interlude with Tupac on the movie set of “Juice.” It was shown in the movie with another woman with Adams’ hairstyle. Tupac based the movie “Poetic Justice” on Adams who wore braids at Brooklyn College and sometimes looked like Janet Jackson in all black.
  8. Adams was on a special movie set of “Malcolm X” at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, where another pivotal scene was shot.
  9. Adams was with three “bad boys” from Queens and Brooklyn.
  10. Adams’ exact outfits and style during her clubbing days was copied by Halle Berry and her handlers to make Berry “come off” like Adams did at clubs in NYC. Adams was asked to wear a wig and change her top and bootie for the special club scene in which Berry was asked to dance like Adams.
  11. The character, Waymon Tisdale, was shown sitting in a business office decorated like Adams’ office at Brooklyn College’s first newspaper, The Kingsman.
  12. Adams lived and worked in Harlem, where a crucial scene was shot.
  13. Monroe, played by Samuel L. Jackson, is like one of Adams’ former bosses
  14. Natalie was the name of Adams’ first best friend.
  15. Halle Berry mimicked Adams’ walk during a fashion shoot by New York Photographer, Clifton Brett. Berry wears similar outfits to Adams, especially in the club scene. Both Adams and Berry had identical looks after Berry appropriated Adams’ beauty pageant look.
  16. The bar scene with a bartender is also about Adams who worked a week as a bartender in training for T’Bones.
  17. The picture of the promotional poster on DVD is more like Adams than Berry, even the shape of the Adams’ bodice and all of her favorite outfits. Everyone of Adams’s outfits on the club scene were replicated.

“Nelson George, the directors and producers have some explaining to do. This is a another cease and desist message for all of them who lied to the America public and caused an international fiasco.”

Dr. Ann Marie Adams

See encapsulation of Adams’ experience below:

Photos courtesy of Clifton Brett, Warner Brothers Pictures, Boomerang, John Wick 3, Parabellum and the White House. Story as recapped to Ann Marie Adams by sources, who claim they were with the FBI. Additional editing and reporting by Dawn Sparks, Anthony Zepperi and Linden Houston. Other sources include Andre Harrell, State Department employees, and other government officials, including U.S. Secret Service and the Federal Bureau of Investigations agents, who want to remain annonymous.

Available Soon: Read the copyright infringement lawsuit against Halle Berry on SCRIBD:

Ann Marie Adams v. Halle Marie Berry 

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Hartford’s Census Rate Dismally Low, Officials Say


HARTFORD — The numbers are in.

Hartford has a dismal record for filling out the census. Consequently, it is the lowest response rate in the nation.

That’s according to U.S. Census officials on Wednesday. That’s why Hartford Public Library will be hosting events to help get city residents to fill out the U.S. Census.

The Library is offering two great incentives — free books and ice cream. The special census events will be at all of its locations from now until Sept. 30 census deadline.

Volunteers will assist with forms and voter registration.

“Voting and completing the census are two of the most fundamental – and easy – things a citizen can do to help their communities. It is our goal at HPL to encourage as many people as we can to participate in the civic process,” HPL’s President/CEO Bridget Quinn-Carey said in a statement Monday morning.

Connecticut has a 66. 7 percent response rate, compared to the national average of average of 62.9 percent. As of August, Hartford has a 44.6 percent response rate, the lowest rate of any city in the country.

There are seven Hartford Public Library census events between now and the end of September:

  • August 25 from 1 to 5 p.m. at Barbour Library, Unity Plaza, 261 Barbour St.
  • Sept. 8 and 15 from 3 to 5 p.m. at Camp Field Library, 30 Camp Field Ave.
  • Sept. 16 from 10 a.m. to noon at the Artbox Lot, 769 Park St. across the street from the Park branch library.
  • Sept. 17 at Dwight Library, 7 New Park Ave., time to be determined.
  • Sept. 18 from noon to 2 p.m. at the main downtown library, 500 Main St.
  • Sept. 23 from 1 to 3 p.m. at Park Library, 744 Park St.

For more details about the events, visit hplct.org.

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Sen. Chris Murphy Moves to Hartford, Answers Question About Permanent Residence


By Marie Stewart, Staff Writer

HARTFORD — Sen. Christopher Murphy is moving to Hartford.

Sen. Murphy and his wife, Cathy Holahan, purchased a house at Charter Oak Place in Hartford for a comfy price of $355,000. The three-bedroom, three-bathroom Victorian-era house is 3,392 square-feet and is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. The contract was finalized in June.

Murphy grew up in Wethersfield and lived in Chesire for more than a decade. He attended Williams College in Massachusetts and graduated from the University of Connecticut School of Law. Afterward, he practiced real estate and banking law with the Hartford firm of Ruben, Johnson & Morgan.

Murphy put his Chesire home on the market in June 2019.

During the 2018 senatorial run, there was a question about where Murphy lived. His primary home was in Washington, D.C. and his children were attending school in DC.

However, Murphy claimed his parents summer house in Old Lyme as his home address while he ran for office in 2018. As the record stands, Murphy ran unopposed in the Democratic primary because someone fraudulently claimed a local journalist was a challenger. That was not the case. The journalist was a victim of media suppression; and her time was used to do so-called “social issues projects.”

Murphy’s team was allegedly the instigators who wanted to glean strategic information about the 2016 presidential election. The Washington Post reported that Murphy was contemplating a run for president in 2016.

Before Murphy was elected for the U.S. Senate in 2012, he served three terms in Connecticut’s Fifth Congreesional District for the U.S. House of Representatives.

He also served for eight years in the Connecticut General Assembly.

Currently, he is serving a second term as senator.

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Black and Puerto Rican Caucus Fights for ‘agenda for equity’


By KELAN LYONS and KEITH M. PHANEUF

Members of the Black and Puerto Rican Caucus added their voices Tuesday to the growing calls for systemic reforms that would make life safer and more equitable for Connecticut’s residents of color.

Recognizing that “no single bill can right centuries of wrongs, let alone a few summer days in the Capitol,” Rep. Brandon McGee, D-Hartford and caucus chair, said the proposals were “a table-setting moment for what we hope will be viewed as a years-spanning commitment to racial equity in Connecticut.”

The proposals are similar to Senate Democrats’ Juneteenth agenda released last month. McGee said the measures are not in conflict with the ideas raised by his legislative colleagues, several of whom joined him Tuesday on the Capitol steps.

“Together they emphasize a growing commitment to systemic change among members of this legislature,” McGee said. “What we’ve done as a caucus, however, is honed in just a little bit more on some of those very, I would say, low-hanging fruit opportunities that would provide again, a larger conversation for policies that we’ve been working on so long, to be able to be passed, supported by our governor.”

Caucus members identified six pillars for reform: voting rights, economic justice, police accountability, education and housing equity and environmental justice. They called for more personal protective equipment for those on the pandemic’s frontlines, closing opportunity and resource gaps for children living in under-resourced school districts and expanding “no-strings-attached homeownership” opportunities. And they proposed updating environmental laws to account for the disproportionate impacts of poor air quality and industrial pollution on communities of color, especially important in the COVID-19 era.

“An individual with underlying health conditions attributed to poor air quality [and] industrial pollution are more susceptible to the detrimental effects of the virus,” said Rep. Geraldo Reyes Jr. , D-Waterbury, vice chair of the caucus.

McGee said caucus members are working with Sen. Gary Winfield, a New Haven Democrat and co-chair of the Judiciary Committee, on a police accountability bill for the upcoming special session. It isn’t clear whether those bills will be separate proposals or a part of the same measure, but they have similar themes: ending discriminatory policing that leads to a disproportionate number of minorities behind bars, expanding community oversight of police officers and creating an independent entity to investigate and hold cops accountable for breaking the law.

The particulars of the proposals are still being negotiated. McGee suggested parts of the agenda, like police accountability measures and new laws that would make it easier to vote, could be floated in the upcoming special session later this month, but others could be dealt with in a second special session later in the summer or fall.

A notable absence: tax reform

Absent from the caucus’ agenda were any proposals to redistribute wealth through tax reform.

Over the past few years, various progressive groups have advocated for higher income tax rates on Connecticut’s wealthiest residents, new and expanded credits to provide state income tax relief to poor and middle-income households, and increased municipal aid to the state’s urban centers.

The Black and Puerto Rican and House Democratic Progressive caucuses, which share many members, pushed for many of these initiatives as recently as last January, when the regular 2020 General Assembly session began.

“True economic justice cannot be achieved until we end the criminalization of poverty and level the playing field for all,” McGee said.

Democrats advocating for a more progressive state and local tax system know one major obstacle to sweeping reforms lies at the head of their party — Gov. Ned Lamont.

The governor, a wealthy Greenwich businessman, defeated a Democratic proposal during his first year in office to impose an income tax surcharge on the capital gains earnings of the state’s wealthiest people, and consistently has argued that higher taxes on top earners would drive them to move out of state.

Connecticut ranks above nearly all states in terms of both income and wealth inequality. Wealth, which takes into account stocks, other investment holdings, property and debt, is even more concentrated at the top here than income.

Critics say Connecticut’s tax system, with its heavy reliance on municipal property taxes and a state sales tax, exacerbates this inequality. These levies are largely regressive, meaning the rates are the same regardless of the taxpayers’ wealth. And many businesses can transfer their tax burdens onto consumers, also disproportionately harming the low-income households.

The working poor in Connecticut pay nearly one-quarter of their earnings to cover state and local taxes, or to cover business taxes shifted onto their households, according to a 2014 state tax analysis. The middle class pay about 13%, while the top 10% of earners pay 10% and the top 1% pay almost 7.5%.

Advocates for progressive state and local tax reform argue increased public sensitivity toward systemic racism make now the right time for legislative action. They attribute this awareness both to the disproportionate toll the coronavirus pandemic has taken on communities of color as well as the May 25 killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police.

But McGee said that while his caucus is committed to mobilize “a growing commitment to systemic change” among legislators, leaders also realize the planned July special session offers a limited “window of opportunity” for change.

After the news conference, McGee said the caucus was still discussing potential progressive tax proposals they could float in a special session, perhaps after the July session, which will be focused on policing and voting access.

“As you can imagine, there are a lot of moving pieces to this,” McGee said. “I really believe that we will have ‘Part Two’ of special session, and (tax reform ) is a part of our long list of items that we want to support.”

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Opening the Economy: Data-Driven and Public Health Approaches


By Jagdish Khubchandani

Policymakers around the world are in a triangular tug of war between fighting COVID-19, economic rehabilitation, and ensuring societal normalcy, well-being, and health. There are no easy answers or cookbook recipes and each question among the how, why, and when to open the economy is more daunting to answer than the other one. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that we cannot make decisions based on social, cultural, religious, or economic preferences alone. Also, decision making cannot be an absolute top-down approach, but a regionally driven strategy with citizen engagement. A few suggestions for our leaders and the public:

*        Analyzing regional data on COVID-19 such as number of cases and deaths, racial/ethnic distribution of the disease, age and gender groups most affected, and social and medical history of those who are affected will help define the unique nature and extent of disease spread among communities and to strategize for customized prevention priorities. We need more testing based on population density so that the maximum number of infected people can be quarantined to break the chain of spread (the 3 T model= trace, test, treat).

*        The key data points to consider in making a decision on opening the economy should be: number of COVID-19 cases, deaths, and recoveries mapped by the smallest geographic unit; the total population of the region with sociodemographic distribution; the number of primary care and emergency services; the number of hospitals and healthcare facilities, COVID-19 testing capacity, and healthcare-related assets available (i.e. materials, devices, and human resources).  Throughout the process, ensure protection of frontline healthcare workers.

Photo Credit: Yahoo Finance

*        The rates of increase or decrease in COVID-19 cases play a major role in estimating regional transmission patterns. If a geographic region does not witness a case for more than a week, that’s positive news. Once the 2-week mark is crossed without a positive case, plans to allow many essential human activities should be formulated and implemented. Additionally, regions should be classified as high risk, moderate risk, and low risk. Those regions that should qualify as high risk should exhibit high numbers and rates of cases or deaths that remain the same or increase over time (call them “hotspots”).

*        We should categorize and redefine services as: highly essential, needed, and wanted. Based on relative importance, we should use a staggered time-phased opening approach. These classifications should keep in view, for each service, the amount of human to human contact, needs and capacities, the potential for large gatherings, demand versus supply of the service, the cost versus benefit of these services, and preparedness at service facilities as it relates to practicing aggressive hygiene and sanitation measures and social distancing for the clientele served. There should be ways to enforce the use of temperature screening devices, masks, sanitizers, and social distancing for all clients.

Photo Credit: New York Post, Dow Jones

*        Increasing the base of health prepared and health trained people in the communities would be another asset. Rapid and swift measures to educate and train lay health workers, non-physician professionals, and accelerating volunteer health services could be a priority. Academic-community partnerships and the use of professional organizations to provide data and scientific services should be done as soon as possible. All of this can be done remotely by data transfer and coordination between regional healthcare facilities, health departments, and state or federal agencies. Existing data are assets that must be utilized.

*        The last strategy is to remain prepared for shutting services again based on real-time regional evidence on COVID-19. We must also estimate, how long after we open the economy will business and industries flourish and how much time it will take to bring normalcy to life (that would create another lag in reaching our full potential). Despite phased openings, we will still see fewer workers, fewer service demands, and lesser clientele.

It is time to utilize these strategies and aggressively prepare for the next phase- opening the economy and looking into the future. We have saved millions of lives by avoiding the disease and cannot lose our gains. However, we also have to be mindful not to lose lives due to other diseases, poverty, and psychological upheaval. Based on regional data and the unique nature of COVID-19 in a community, decisions should be left to counties and local governments on opening the economy. Such decisions should also engage regional healthcare providers, scientists, business owners, and representatives of the general public. We need to reappraise the values of our democracy- of the people, for the people, and by the people. Finally, it is high time, we think global and act local.

Jagdish Khubchandani, MBBS, PhD is a Professor of Health Science at Ball State University and has a doctorate in both Medicine and Public health.

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Hartford Hits Grim Reality With COVID-19, First Infant Death


By Thomas Nocera, Staff Writer

HARTFORD — Hartford has likely set a grim and new global record as it struggles to contain its own Coronavirus outbreak –  the youngest victim to die from the illness passed away in the city in April.

It is reportedly the first around the world.

Just shy of seven-weeks old, the infant girl was reported to be in an unresponsive state when rushed to St. Francis Hospital, according to officials. Though doctors and nurses tried desperately to resuscitate her, Chief State Medical Examiner James Gill confirmed the child’s death on Thursday in an email.

“The infant did test positive for the COVID-19 virus and an autopsy was done at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner,” Gill wrote.

While medical officials say they can’t confirm the final cause of death until a necessary battery of tests is performed, the news has already rippled throughout the state. With the death of someone so young from the illness a rarity, Gov. Ned Lamont addressed the “tragic milestone” in a press conference.

“Probably the youngest person, ever, to die of COVID,” he recently informed viewers, “has died here in Connecticut.”

Urging people to continue practicing social distancing, Lamont joined an increasingly loud chorus of elected officials asking for the public’s help – including Mayor Luke Bronin. In a press conference Friday, Bronin announced a troubling new statistic: the 120 now-confirmed COVID cases in Hartford marks a 50 percent increase from just two days ago. In response, he said, his administration would be enforcing new, stricter measures.

“We are stepping up enforcement efforts to require social distancing,” he said. Specifically, inspectors will be “assessing compliance with social distancing requirements” at many stores still open throughout the city.

As the virus slowly burns its way through communities across the country, Hartford’s steady increase in cases has been thoroughly tracked and documented. While cases are spread widely throughout, pinpointed statistics on everything from the number of cases and deaths, to changes in the rate of infection, have been essential in informing the government’s response. Those statistics aren’t compiled in Hartford however. Instead they make their way through a web of hospitals and state officials before hitting the Mayor’s desk. Hartford’s Director of Health, Liany Arroyo, explained how that network functions in a statement:

“We receive information about cases and fatalities from the State Department of Public Health, which receives data from hospitals and laboratories. The numbers we get are directly from the State, which compiles information and inputs it into a statewide database which our local Health Department accesses multiple times a day.”

Analysis of that database has led city officials to embrace more stringent rules, concluding that the outbreak will get worse before it gets better. While Bronin hopes his new measures will eventually help decrease the number of cases, he struck a somber tone about the near future.

“We’re going to be in this for a while,” he said Friday. “We’re going to be seeing increases for a while.”

Posted in Hartford, Health, Nation, Neighborhood, YouthComments (0)

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