Tag Archive | "UConn"

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UConn Breaks Ground for New Campus


HARTFORD – UConn students and administrators, state and local officials celebrated the start of construction on the university’s new downtown Hartford campus by breaking ground and raising the UConn flag at the site Monday.

The campus will be anchored by the former Hartford Times building, where UConn President Susan Herbst was joined Monday by Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, UConn Board of Trustees Chairman Larry McHugh, Hartford Mayor Pedro E. Segarra, several legislators, and a crowd of other guests to celebrate the event.

The campus will open for classes in fall 2017 with about 2,300 students and 250 faculty members. Construction includes the addition of a new attached five-story building while retaining the iconic Beaux-Arts façade of the 95-year-old Hartford Times structure.

The $115 million project is funded primarily through Next Generation Connecticut, the initiative supported by Malloy and the General Assembly to expand STEM education and other offerings at UConn to drive economic growth throughout the state.

Officials said the move returns UConn to its roots in Hartford, where it had been located from its opening in 1939 until it moved in 1970 to West Hartford.

In keeping with the neighborhood campus concept, the building will have an exterior courtyard open daily to the public, and retail stores at ground level to encourage public visits.

In all, the campus will comprise about 217,000 square feet between the Times anchor building, a building that UConn is purchasing at 38 Prospect St., and space in other nearby buildings in partnership with those neighboring entities.

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John Dempsey Hospital Has Some Explaining to Do


By Ann-Marie Adams

The University of Connecticut’s John Dempsey Hospital has some explaining to do.
After months of requesting medical records for an emergency visit to this hospital in April, I have yet to receive all my records, primarily to prove the horror that occur on that faithful day I was forced into the hospital.
Dr_AnnMarie_AdamsIt was a scary six-month journey of encounters with medical students and doctors who seemed frighteningly out of touch with reality. And this is not hyperbole.
What was frightening to me is that they were not used to interacting with many educated black women such as myself—much less formulate a socio-psycho evaluation of me. In fact, I hardly came in contact with any black or culturally competent doctors.
the-hartford-guardian-OpinionI moved through the Hartford-area medical systems in a state of shock because I did not know it was that bad. The situation then turns into another nightmare when I asked for my own medical records six months ago.
According to Connecticut’s state law, doctors and medical facilities are required to promptly allow patients to review or get copies of their medical records. For John Dempsey, it has been a six-month maze, leaving me to conclude that they are covering up the big mess they caused by their “mistake.”
What was even more frightening is that they were forcing medications on me without a signed consent form. I went into the hospital on April 4, 2014 a healthy, strong woman and came out with all manner of illness. Naturally, I was curious about the details of my stay.
After waiting so long to review the information, I’m starting to believe they are hesitant about even having me review the records because there is something untoward about that faithful day. And it must be investigated.
So I was patient. I made another visit to the medical record office, and I was told that another option was to just make an appointment to review the records. I spoke to Michele Brackett, who is the supervisor of the medical reviewing unit. And a month later, I’m still waiting for an appointment—just to look at those records.
This is odd.
If John Dempsey has nothing to hide, its medical records supervisors should have had a logical explanation when I visited the office recently. They didn’t. It also occurred to me that these people are not aware of that there is a law that exists to regulate this matter. Or they just don’t care.
But it should be said in this case, John Dempsey, that it was the cover up—not the crime—that usually gets the culprits.

Perhaps it’s time for your staff to review the Hippocratic oath. It’s right here.

And send me my damn records—all of it.

Dr. Ann-Marie Adams is an award-winning journalist/historian and the founder of The Hartford Guardian. She has worked for numerous local and international publications, including The Hartford Courant, People Magazine, Washington Post, The Root, Fox News and NBC News4. She has also taught history and journalism at Howard University, Quinnipiac University and Rutgers University.


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NAACP Supports UConn NCAA Suspension


HARTFORD — The nation’s oldest civil rights group has supported the decision of the NCAA to suspend the University of Connecticut from the 2013 post-season for failing to meet the new standards of the Academic Progress Rate rule advocated by the NAACP.

“It is critical that colleges and universities are held responsible for the academic success of the students that represent them on the athletic field,” stated NAACP President and CEO Benjamin Todd Jealous.  “These new rules make sure that the student is the primary component of the student/athlete equation.”

Last year, the NAACP joined U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and TIDES Director Richard Lapchick in urging the NCAA to raise its academic standards. The new rules adopted by the NCAA effectively require Division I teams to graduate over half of their players in order to participate in the postseason. This higher threshold will help bring the student/athlete relationship back into balance, and ensure that college athletes are not only motivated to succeed on the court but also to succeed at life.
“It is unfortunate that the University of Connecticut failed to meet the basic academic standards for its athletic programs,” stated Connecticut NAACP State Conference President Scot X. Esdaile. “The NAACP is willing to work with any and all universities to ensure their students can experience both academic and athletic success.”

 

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Police Arrest Three in Jasper Howard Murder


By Associated Press

STORRS, Conn. – Police on Tuesday charged a man with the murder in the stabbing death of a University of Connecticut football player outside a school-sanctioned dance, but his defense attorney says he was just trying to break up a fight.

Two others also were charged in the fight that led to the death of 20-year-old Jasper Howard, of Miami.

John William Lomax III, 21, of Bloomfield, was arrested Tuesday morning and charged with murder, police said. His bond was set at $2 million.

Police would not discuss evidence or a motive during a news conference Tuesday. More than 40 investigators conducted more than 200 interviews and “have not stopped working,” UConn police chief Robert Hudd said.

Police charged Hakim Muhammad, 20, of Bloomfield, with conspiracy to commit assault and Jamal Todd, 21, of Hartford, with a felony charge of falsely reporting an incident and a misdemeanor charge of reckless endangerment. Police say he pulled the fire alarm that emptied the dance early Oct. 18, triggering the fight.

UConn Stabbing FootballJasper Howard Lomax, who is not a UConn student and lives 30 miles from campus, wasn’t present when the argument started and doesn’t know what it was about, but tried to break up the fight, said his attorney, Deron Freeman.

“He was just partying,” Freeman said. “Often people from out of town go to the UConn campus to party.”

Lomax, a Bloomfield High School graduate who works in information technology, goes by the nickname “Pooda.” He last logged into his MySpace page in March, when he listed his occupation as “taking care of my daughter.”

On his Facebook page, Lomax’s friends include Muhammad and 21-year-old Johnny Hood of Hartford, who was arrested last week and faces charges of breach of peace and interfering with police.

Freeman said he was first told that Lomax would be charged in connection with the fight, but not with murder.

“I’m surprised,” Freeman said. “I’m curious to find out what evidence they had to secure an arrest warrant for murder. … From all the evidence I’ve heard, he was not involved in the stabbing.”

UConn president Michael Hogan said in a message to students and staff: “Nothing can replace the void in our hearts left by his death. Yet, I know that many of you will feel reassured by today’s news.”

Howard, a starting cornerback whose nickname was Jazz, was stabbed outside a university-sanctioned dance, hours after helping his team to a homecoming game win over Louisville.

The entire UConn team attended his funeral Monday in Miami, where Howard was eulogized by coach Randy Edsall as “the ultimate son, he was the ultimate brother. He was the ultimate teammate. He was the ultimate friend. They didn’t come any better than Jazz.”

UConn football players said they were happy that an arrest was made, but that it was of little comfort.

“It is a little closure, but the reality is my teammate’s still not here with us,” said running back Jordan Todman.

Several players said Tuesday they had never heard of Lomax, and don’t know how Lomax and Howard crossed paths.

“I know that his mother is very excited that someone is being charged with this crime. That’s all I’ve been really thinking about, just how his family is doing,” said defensive tackle Kendall Reyes.

Greg Lloyd, a junior linebacker, said they are relieved that someone is being held accountable for Howard’s death.

“I wish only that it didn’t happen at all so at least I can have my teammate back,” he said. “It’s unreal grief for the family, unreal grief for his friends – it’s just a shame.”

An athletics department spokesman said Edsall did not plan to make any public statements on the arrests Tuesday.

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