Tag Archive | "U.S. Deportation"

Tags: , ,

Is Dominican Immigration Policy Obamafied?


By Roberto Lovato,  Latino Rebels

DAJABÓN, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC—On a recent afternoon in this tense border town, a hub for the flow of goods and people between Haiti and the Dominican Republic, Haitian immigrants and their Dominican-born children were preparing for the worst: the mass deportations they’d been hearing about for months from railing Dominican politicians and, especially, the local media.

Streets that are usually busy with Haitian street vendors were relatively empty because, migrants’ rights advocates told me, many of them of them were in hiding. At the border crossing, the crush of thousands of people who travel daily between Haiti and the Dominican Republic for work and trade was even more intense than usual as busloads of Haitians voluntarily left their homes in the Dominican Republic rather than be hunted down, jailed and deported as government officials has repeatedly promised in the months leading up a June 17 deadline.

Tensions in Dajabón and across the country have been on the rise since 2013, when the country’s constitutional tribunal decided to revoke citizenship from tens of thousands of people born of foreign-born parents. Then, in 2014, President Danilo Medina issued a decree requiring all undocumented people to register with the government to “regularize” their status in the country by June 17, 2015, further increasing pressure on Haitians in the Dominican Republic. Those providing the required documentation were supposed to be given a two-year temporary status document. Those who don’t will be deported.

Haitian, Dominican and international human rights groups have denounced the process as dangerous, discriminatory and beset by massive bureaucratic failures— including lost papers, understaffed processing offices and corruption. As a result, over 200,000 people, most of them Haitian or of Haitian descent have been left vulnerable to deportation. Many here believe the current crisis follows a well-established pattern of racism against Haitians in the Dominican Republic.

man-beaten-by-dominican-pokice-for-complaining-about-problems-with-regularization-process1-450x600.jpg 

Some Haitians, feeling scared and persecuted, are fleeing even without the government forcing them. “We have reports that Haitian immigrant homes have been burned down,” said the announcer on a bilingual Creole-Spanish radio show last Friday. “And we do not know if the Haitians themselves burned the homes or if Dominican citizens had burned the homes.” (Non-governmental organizations later confirmed that Haitians had burned their own homes to dispose of property they couldn’t take with them back to Haiti.)

But in the end, the predictions of swift, mass expulsions, of government buses overflowing with Haitians deportees, have yet to materialize.

Read More

Editor’s Note: This piece was first published on June 26 at LatinoRebels.com. All photos by the author. 

Posted in Featured, NationComments (0)

Tags: ,

Jamaicans and Latin Americans Among Highest Deportees from the U.S.


By Afro

The United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency said Jamaicans were among the top 10 groups of nationals deported in 2013.

In announcing the year-end removal numbers on Dec. 26, ICE officials said the top 10 groups deported hailed from Latin America and the Caribbean.

afro_jamaica-us-deportationICE reported that 1,119 Jamaicans were deported in the 2013 fiscal year, while 2,462 nationals from the Dominican Republic were also deported.

Those numbers are vastly smaller, however, than the number of Mexicans deported. ICE officials said Mexico continues to be the leading country of origin for those who are removed from the United States, followed by Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador.

The figures for Mexico show 241,493 deportees; Guatemala 47,769; Honduras 37,049; El Salvador 21,602; Ecuador 1,616; Brazil 1,500; Colombia 1,429; and Nicaragua 1,383.

ICE said 98 percent of the agency’s total removals were convicted criminals, recent border crossers, illegal re-entrants or those previously removed in line with the agency’s enforcement priorities.

ICE officials said the figures highlight the agency’s ongoing commitment to primary immigration enforcement missions: the apprehension of criminal aliens and other immigration violators in the interior of the United States; and the detention and removal of individuals apprehended by ICE and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) while attempting to unlawfully enter the United States, ICE said.

ICE’s acting director, John Sandweg, said the 2013 numbers make clear that, “We are enforcing our nation’s laws in a smart and effective way, meeting our enforcement priorities by focusing on convicted criminals while also continuing to secure our nation’s borders in partnership with CBP.

Posted in Featured, NationComments (0)

  • Latest News
  • Tags
  • Subscribe
Advertise Here