Tag Archive | "Hilary Clinton"

Tags: ,

The Leads Grow as Trump wins Big, Clinton Narrowly in Connecticut


Connecticut propelled Republican Donald J. Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton closer to their parties’ presidential nominations Tuesday, with Trump winning a landslide and Clinton holding off a tenacious Bernie Sanders.

Trump won all five primaries Tuesday along I-95: Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island. Clinton lost only Rhode Island. Connecticut was the last state placed in her column, a win declared around 10:30 p.m. by the Associated Press and most networks.

“I consider myself the presumptive nominee,” Trump said in televised remarks from New York City.

Rep. Tony D’Amelio, R-Waterbury, one of the few elected officials here to endorse Trump, said it was time for other Republican officials to shake off their reservations about the brash billionaire, who has belittled foes, demonized Muslims and undocumented immigrants, and accused GOP leaders of trying to rig what may yet be a contested convention in Cleveland.

“I think it’s time for the Republican Party to come together,” D’Amelio said. “He just swept the entire Northeast, Pennsylvania, Maryland and the rest of it. There is a strong movement in this country for Donald Trump. I think his message is resonating throughout the nation.”

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, a top Clinton supporter who now will begin work as co-chair of the Democratic platform committee, said the state’s voters made the right choice.

“Secretary Clinton is the right candidate to move our country forward and grow our economy from the middle out,” Malloy said. “As she has proved throughout her career, Hillary Clinton gets results, and I am proud to have endorsed her candidacy.”

Clinton tweeted a thank you to the state.

Sanders says he will continue to campaign.

“If you heard the boss on TV tonight, Senator Sanders made it clear – we’re going forward,” Paul Feeney, the director of his Connecticut campaign, told about three dozen supporters at a hotel in Meriden. “We knew in Connecticut that it was going to be a tough crowd for us. Closed primaries have been tough for this campaign.”

A spokesman for the Connecticut Democratic Party had no estimate Tuesday night of how the state’s 71 delegates would be apportioned. Clinton already had commitments from 15 of 16 superdelegates. The remaining 55 would be awarded based on the results statewide and in each of the five congressional districts.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump invites Rep. Tony D'Amelio, R-Waterbury, onto the stage with him at Crosby High School in Waterbury on Saturday.

Kyle Constable / CTMirror.org

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump invites Rep. Tony  D’Amelio, R-Waterbury, onto the stage with him at Crosby High School in Waterbury on Saturday.

The only question for Trump seemed to be whether he had shut out Ohio Gov. John Kasich, the second-place finisher, in the 4th Congressional District of Fairfield County. Connecticut is sending 28 delegates to the Republican convention in Cleveland, including three superdelegates.

“We’re going to go over the numbers in the morning, but it looks as though Trump won everything,” said J.R. Romano, the Republican state chairman.

Kasich’s state chairman congratulated Trump, but said the campaign would not concede the nomination.

“If Trump gets to 1,237, he has earned the nomination, but until that happens, I know that everyone is going to work their darndest to create an environment in which there is an open convention,” said state Sen. Tony Hwang of Fairfield, the state chairman of the Kasich campaign.

For a first-ballot victory, Trump needs 1,237 votes in Cleveland.

Clinton appears to need about 250 more delegates to reach the 2,383 necessary to win the nomination in Philadelphia.

Trump closed his campaign with boisterous rallies Saturday in Waterbury and Bridgeport, part of a four-day blitz that drew every candidate to Connecticut except Ted Cruz, the Texas senator.

Trump won 58 percent of the vote. Kasich, the choice of many Republican officials, finished second with about 28 percent, and Cruz of Texas was a distant third.

Clinton won about 52 percent of the Democratic vote.

Clinton had a 9 percentage point lead over Sanders in a Quinnipiac University poll a week ago and was backed by nearly every prominent Democrat, led by Malloy, Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman and the entire congressional delegation. A survey by Public Policy Polling showed Sanders, who drew an audience of 14,000 to the New Haven Green on Sunday, within two percentage points over the weekend.

Sanders looked to Connecticut and Rhode Island for wins that would bolster what began as a Quixotic campaign by a 74-year-old self-described Democratic socialist and became a surprisingly strong challenge to a former first lady, U.S. senator and secretary of state.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton poses for a picture with a supporter after her rally at the University of Bridgeport on Sunday.

kyle constable / ctmirror.org

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton poses for a picture with a supporter after her rally at the University of Bridgeport on Sunday.

He was declared the winner in Rhode Island after 9 p.m., his first and last bit of good news.

The cities, where Sanders generally has lagged in previous primaries, were slow to report, but New Haven’s Democratic chair, Vinnie Mauro, said he believed Clinton would comfortably  win his city, despite a huge college population at Yale, Southern Connecticut State University and the University of New Haven. Clinton won the African American neighborhoods and ran slightly ahead in some Yale precincts, he said.

“Secretary Clinton really had a good turnout,” he said.

Clinton won 57 percent of the vote in New Haven, 70 percent in Hartford, 65 percent in Bridgeport and 64 percent in Stamford. Her margins were close in Waterbury, New Britain and Meriden. Sanders carried eastern Connecticut, including the college towns of Mansfield, Middletown and New London

CNN exit polling showed Clinton winning 69 percent of the black vote and 57 percent of the woman’s vote.

With an unlikely path to the nomination for Sanders, Clinton supporters here have been waiting for his surge to play out, letting the party begin to work to corral the new voters drawn by the Vermont senator’s call for Democrats to attack social, racial and economic injustice.

Bernie Sanders had the biggest rally in Connecticut, but still lost.

Kyle Constable / CTMirror.org

Bernie Sanders had the biggest rally in Connecticut, but still lost.

“It’s never easy, but I think it will be a lot easier in the Democratic Party than it will be in the Republican Party this year,” Malloy said after voting earlier Tuesday. “I think that’s very clear. You can almost see the Sanders folks and the Clinton folks take a bit of a turn to get ready.”

EMILY’s List, the influential group that backs Democratic women who support abortion rights, immediately sent an email directed at Connecticut voters, calling Clinton’s victory in the state “a victory for women across the nation.”

U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy reached out to Sanders.

“Bernie is a good friend and he ran a strong race, and I know he’ll do what it takes to ensure Democrats keep the White House,” he said.

Speaking in Philadelphia, Clinton took care to compliment Sanders and his supporters.

“I applaud Sen. Sanders and his millions of supporters for challenging us to get unaccountable money out of our politics and giving greater emphasis to closing the gap of inequality,” she said. “And I know together we will get that done. Whether you support Sen. Sanders or you support me, there is much more that unites us than divides us.”

The Working Families Party, the labor offshoot that endorsed Sanders, was not ready to let go of Sanders’ issues, even if his candidacy dimmed considerably.

“This isn’t over. Every vote and every delegate for Bernie Sanders is a declaration of support for big progressive ideas, and a peaceful political revolution that will change this country in the coming years,” said Dan Kantor, the national director. “We need a fair economy and a real democracy, and the fact that so many people across the country, especially young people, share this view is cause for great optimism.

Republican presidential candidate John Kasich speaks at Glastonbury High School Friday with his traveling national debt clock running behind him.

Kyle Constable / CTMirror.org

Republican presidential candidate John Kasich speaks at Glastonbury High School Friday with his traveling national debt clock running behind him.

Clinton was declared the early winner Tuesday in Maryland and Delaware, the first of what Malloy hoped would be a number of wins placing her on the verge of becoming the first woman to win a presidential nomination in the U.S.

“After today, she will be well over 2,000 delegates and really within a hair’s breath of the actual nomination, which will come in the not-too distant future,” Malloy said.

The Republican primary was no contest. Trump led in every public poll in Connecticut, and exit polling indicated he would end the evening with about 60 percent of the vote.

After the polls closed, his campaign was unsure only of results in the 4th Congressional District of Fairfield County, where Kasich won three of the district’s 17 communities, Darien, New Canaan and Westport and .

“We clearly won the other four districts. The likelihood is if he maintains his percentage statewide, it would be hard to lose the 4th District,” said Ben Proto, who is working for Trump in Connecticut.

Proto echoed D’Amelio and suggested it was time for the GOP’s elected officials to join the campaign – or risk being out of sync with their constituents.

“They are going to have to take a real hard look at this and take a look at their towns,” Proto said.

Aside from Trump’s strong showing, Proto said the campaign fielded reports all day of other voters who turned up at the polls to vote for him, only to be told they were ineligible in Connecticut’s closed primary as unaffiliated or Democratic voters.

Over the weekend in Connecticut, Trump mocked the idea of toning down his rhetoric and trying to act more presidential. On Tuesday night, he was respectful to Cruz, but his final message before exiting was to denigrate Clinton as a candidate whose only asset was gender.

“I think the only card she has is the women’s card. She’s got nothing else going. Frankly, if Hillary Clinton were a man, I don’t think she’d get five percent of the vote,” Trump said. “The only thing she’s got going is the woman’s card, and the beautiful thing is, women don’t like her, OK?”

Some Connecticut Republican legislators still were cool to their front runner after his victory and clung to the shrinking hope of an open convention.

“Neutral and silent” is how Rep. Livvy Floren of Greenwich, where Trump beat Kasich, 48 percent to 41 percent, described most of her fellow Republicans in the General Assembly. “Neutral and silent is how we’ll remain until the end.”

Kyle Constable contributed to this report.

Posted in Business, Featured, Hartford, NationComments (0)

Tags: ,

Hilary Clinton Visits Hartford, Talks About Gun Violence


By Ann-Marie Adams | @annmarieadams

HARTFORD — Coming off her primary victory in New York, Presidential Candidate Hilary Clinton on Thursday met with families of Connecticut victims touched by gun violence.

 
The gathering of about 250 invited guests and supporters inside the Y conveyed the level of intimacy Clinton wanted to have on her campaign trail in Hartford, supporters said. The issue of gun violence, which affect about 30,000 Americans each year was discussed to aid Clinton’s push for stricter gun laws in the wake of the Sandy Hook shooting in Newtown, Connecticut.

 

 

Clinton spent about 90 minutes at the Wilson-Gray YMCA taking questions after discussing mass shooting in Newtown and gun violence prevention.

 

 

“I’m not here to make promises I can’t keep. I wa m here to tell you I will use every single minute of every day looking for ways we can save lives that we can change the gun culture,” she said. “It is too easy for people to reach for a gun to settle their problems. It makes no sense.”

 
The panelists included Erica Smegielski, the daughter of Dawn Hochsprung, who was killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting.

 
“Hilary Rodham Clinton has been a champion for gun violence prevention for her entire career,” Smegielski said. “I know she is the only person in this race that can deliver real results.”

 
Clinton’s visit to Hartford’s North End followed Chelsea Clinton’s visit to the North End at Dunn’s River. Her visit follows that of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. Other presidential candidates to visit include John Kasich, who will be in Glastonbury on Friday. Trump will be in Waterbury on Saturday. And Democratic Challenger Bernie Sanders will be at the Convention Center in Downtown Hartford.

 
Other panelists at the event on Thursday included Nelba Marquez-Greene, the mother of 6-year-old daughter Ana Grace also killed in the school shootings. The New Haven Chapter President of Mothers Demand Action Kim Washington and MDA member Deborah Davis were also in attendance.

 
Hartford resident Iran Nazario, founder of Compass Peace Builders, was also a panelist. He said that at the age of 12, he lost his brother to gun violence. He said there are young men who are still struggling because of grief from the loss of friends and family.

 
“There are kids out there whose souls are trapped,” he said. “And they need us.”
Clinton, in her brief remarks during the 90-minute session, reminded her supporters that the National Rifle Association has blocked many efforts to change gun laws. She praised the mothers in attendance for sharing their stories who have withstood harassment because of their campaign against gun violence.

 
Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin said Clinton’s visit has helped to shine a spotlight on gun violence in the city. So far, there have been five homicides in 2016. For of those five victims, he said, are because of gun violence.

Photo Credit: Getty Images

Posted in Featured, Hartford, NationComments (0)

Tags: , ,

Hilary Clinton and Bernie Sanders Spar in Eight Democratic Debate in Brooklyn


By Ann-Marie Adams | @annmarieadams

BROOKLYN, N.Y.  — Sen. Bernie Sanders performance in the Brooklyn Democratic  debate with Former Secretary of State Hilary Clinton on Thursday moved him closer to winning more delegates in the New York primary. But some political observers saidthe question of whether he can put a dent into Clinton’s lead in Tuesday’s primary is open for discussion.

Sanders, who began the 90-minute debate in Brooklyn’s Navy Yard on Thursday, was the only Democratic challenger left to contend with the formidable presidential front runner, who rests heavily on her husband’s brand loyalty.

In his fiery attacks against Clinton’s promises on the presidential campaign, he pledged bold and progressive goals for America, while responding to questions about Clinton’s qualification and credibility to be president.

“Does Secretary Clinton have the experience and the intelligence to be a president? Of course she does,” said Sanders, who has known Clinton for 25 years.

Sanders also made note of his trajectory from the beginning of his campaign almost a year ago, saying he was at 3 percent in the polls and about 70 points behind Clinton. Now, one day before the New York primary, Sanders is ahead in at least two polls. Of the last nine caucuses and primaries, Sanders won eight.

“The reason that our campaign has done so well is because we’re doing something very radical: We’re telling the American people the truth,” Sanders said after sustained applause. “And the truth is that this country is not going to move forward in a significant way for working people unless we overturn this disastrous Citizens United Supreme Court decision. And unless we have real campaign reform so that billionaires and super PACs cannot buy elections.”

Sanders also said that if he were elected, he would tackle a rigged economy that prefers the 1 percent before he questioned Clinton’s relationship with Super PACs, which he said are collecting tens of millions of dollars from special interests, including $15 million from Wall Street.

Former President Bill Clinton’s influence on the electorate gave his wife a commanding lead with votes and delegates before what can be billed as the most contentious debate since last spring.

Clinton articulated her platform on big banks, gun control and minimum wages with confidence against the Vermont Senator  Sanders. Clinton also fended off criticism about her ties to Wall Street, her taxes and her speeches at Goldman Sachs. She said when others release transcripts of their speeches, she will release hers.

Responding to questions about her qualification and judgment to be president, Clinton said:

“Senator Sanders did call me unqualified. I’ve been called a lot of things in my life. That was a first…. President Obama trusted my judgment enough to ask me to be secretary of State for the United States.

Clinton also outlined her plan to raise the national minimum wage from $7.25 to $12, while Sanders firmly pledged to raise it to $15 if they were elected president.
Both candidates seemingly have the same vision with nuances on how to reach their goals. However, the former New York senator has a double digit lead in New York.

But Sanders “has the message and the plan that lifts all of us and speak more to people of color and the poor,” said Former Ohio Sen. Nina Turner.

New York State Sen. Ruben Diaz (Bronx–D) countered that sentiment, saying: “Hilary has a track record on all the issues that speak for us. Unfortunately, what Bernie does is talk about the issues, not solutions.”

Just five days before New York’s primary, Thursday’s debate was likely Sanders’ only remaining opportunity to cut into Clinton’s growing lead in the Empire State.

When asked by CNN moderator Wolf Blitzer whether he owed the Sandy Hook families an apology, Sanders didn’t hesitate with a response.

“No, I don’t think I owe them an apology,” he said.

The exchange came just hours after a ruling by a Connecticut judge not to dismiss a lawsuit by families of the Newtown massacre victims.

Former National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Ben Jealous said he will vote for Sanders because Clinton is not a political friend to black people.

“Hilary Clinton is not a political friend because she helped to champion lifetime limit on welfare. Since her husband’s 1996 welfare reform bill, we have twice as many people living on welfare,” Jealous said. ” She will be carrying on the agenda of her husband rather than Obama. Also, her relationship with Wall Street is complex at best.”

Gov. Andrew Cumo said Clinton will win.

“Her advantage here is New Yorkers know her. She was a New York Senator for many years. They watched her. She delivered,” Cumo said. “She has produced for this state and New Yorkers know that. She delivered for new York. I think New York will deliver for her.”

The latest RealClearPolitics average of polling in New York shows Clinton leading Sanders 53%-39% in the state.

Currently, Clinton has 1,758 delegates to Sanders’ 1,069, including superdelegates. New York’s 291 delegates will be allocated proportionally, based on the election results.

Posted in Featured, Nation, PoliticsComments (0)

Tags: , , ,

Hilary Clinton Leads in Polls After South Carolina Democratic Debate


By Ann-Marie Adams, Staff Writer
CHARLESTON, S. C. – After a contentious debate between the two leading Democratic presidential candidates, Hilary Clinton emerged as a leader in the polls, pushing back an insurgent candidate from Vermont.

 
Clinton sparred with the Sen. Bernie Sanders, who brands himself as a Democratic Socialist. Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley came in a distant third after the fourth debate in Charleston, South Carolina. The debate was moderated by NBC News’ Lester Holt and Andrea Mitchell.

 
According to polls released on Sunday by NBC News/Wall Street Journal, the former secretary of state received 59 percent support from Democratic primary voters, while 34 percent support the Vermont senator. Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley received 2 percent support.

 
Before the debate, another poll two weeks before the first votes in Iowa, 79 percent of Democratic primary voters say they would support Clinton. And of those same pollers, 66 percent say they would support Sanders.

 
Historically, the South Carolina primary election has been more important to the Republican Party’s nomination process, used to eliminate serious contenders facing the party’s frontrunner.

 
Clinton challenged Sanders on his policy shifts on universal health care, one of President Barack Obama’s signature achievements. Sanders said he would also build on Obamacare and tweak it to be Medicaid for all who are eligible, instead getting rid of Obamacare.

 
Positing herself as someone who can do “all aspects of the job,” the second-time presidential candidate also questioned Sanders policy shift on gun control. She also labeled Sanders as a fringe candidate, saying he would be unelectable.

 
Sanders pushed back with poll numbers, which puts him closer to Clinton before the South Carolina debates.

 
“When this campaign began, she was 50 points ahead of me,” he said. “We were all of three percentage points. Guess what? In Iowa and New Hampshire, the race is very, very close.”

 
He also cited his close tie in a general election against Trump.

 
Sanders beats Trump by 54 percent to 39 percent. And Clinton polled with 51 percent to 41 percent.

 
The two candidates took center stage because of Sanders gains in the polls before the Iowa caucuses. They also argued on who would be best to build on Obama’s legacy on healthcare and gun control, two hot-button issues fought vigorously in the Republican-led House and Senate.

 
Clinton proposed to build on Obama’s legacy and Sanders said he would be the right candidate that appeals to the current sentiments of the Democratic Party.

 
Sanders tried to present himself as the bolder choice to build on Mr. Obama’s legacy.

 
Despite the impressive showing by Sanders in these polls, one thing is clear: Clinton is leading Sanders.

 
O’Mally got feisty in the last democratic debate before the Iowa caucus, criticizing the two leading and “tested” candidates and show his support for privacy rights.

 
In response to the YouTube viewer about his stance on privacy versus security.

 
“I believe whether it’s a backdoor or a front door that the American principle of law should still hold our federal government should have to get a warrant, whether they want to come through the backdoor or your front door,” O’Malley said.

 
South Carolinians are expected to vote on Feb. 27.

Posted in Featured, Nation, PoliticsComments (0)

Tags: , , ,

White House: President Obama May Give Endorsement for Democratic Primary


By Ann-Marie Adams |

WASHINGTON — White House officials on Monday said President Barack Obama may break his silence on whether he would endorse candidates for the Democratic primary.

 
Expected to be in lame-duck territory beginning this fall, Obama’s agenda has been driving the debate among popular candidates running for the presidency.

 
Observers are speculating whether Obama would endorse his vice president, Joe Biden or his former Secretary of State Hilary Clinton. Currently, Clinton is the front-runner for the party’s nomination. And Biden is seriously exploring a run in 2016 presidential race. Biden, who had his first meeting with Obama after he announced a possible bid for the White House’s top spot, is expected to make his decision next month, officials said.

 

A Biden versus Clinton redux would divide the Obama camp, some say.

 
Ask whether Obama would remain neutral throughout the primary process, White House Spokesman Josh Earnest said the president would let the Democratic voters choose the Democratic nominee but “wouldn’t rule out the possibility of an endorsement in the Democratic primary.”

 
Democrats in Connecticut have already signaled their pick for the primary. Today, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy is expected to campaign for Clinton in New Hampshire. Malloy endorsed Clinton’s presidential candidacy in June.

 
Obama is facing the possibility of a second government shutdown of his presidency. Several conservative Republicans have threatened to hold funding bills to keep the government open after Oct. 1 if federal money for Planned Parenthood is not cut.

 
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, (R-Ky.), dismissed idea of a shutdown, saying Congress has “been down this path before.”

 
Still, that and other issues, including the Iran deal, are expected to spill into the 2016 presidential campaign.

Posted in Featured, Nation, PoliticsComments (0)

  • Latest News
  • Tags
  • Subscribe
Advertise Here