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Organizer, LGH President Ted Carroll to Retire


After more than 30 years, community organizer Ted Carroll will retire as President next summer from Leadership Hartford. The effective date is June 30.

Carroll recently announced his retirement to the organization’s board of directors.  The board has begun a national search for his successor.

Leadership Greater Hartford Leader Ted Carroll to retire.

The LGH was founded in 1986. It trains and connects leaders in the Greater Hartford area.

“I firmly believe that our organization’s best days are ahead of us and not behind us,” Carroll said in a letter to constituents Tuesday. “My fondest hope is that we’ll continue together to lead, love and serve a community to which I remain deeply committed.”

A Hartford resident, Carroll began his career as the executive director of Hartford’s Southend Community Services, which educates urban youth on becoming economically independent. The organization is now known as Our Piece of the Pie. He was also a Hartford Board of Education member.

Carroll, in collaboration with Hartford 2000, trained neighborhood leaders from the Neighborhood Revitalization Zone program that helped to develop the nonprofit organization that produces The Hartford Guardian news publication, now thehartfordguardian.com.

 “Ted has given LGH and our region the best of himself for more than three decades, and his work will undoubtedly influence Hartford leaders for generations to come,” said LGH board chair Jason Jakubowski, also CEO of Foodshare.

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FBI Warns Residents of Hoax


G. Shirley, Staff Writer

HARTFORD — The Federal Bureau of Investigation in New Haven on Monday said that residents in urban areas may be receiving a call saying they are the subject of an FBI investigation.

FBI New Haven posted the news on twitter to warn potential victims of scammers.

The news comes after reports of locals in Avon and Hartford impersonating FBI agents, sneaking into people’s home with high-tech devices to do so-called investigations for political campaigns.

The perpetrators were unseen and anonymous people–said to be police officers in Avon and Simsbury, who stalked unsuspecting homeowners, falsify records and plant evidence, reports said.

Residents are asked to send tips to tips.fbi.gov. For emergencies, dial 911.

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The Cosby Show And Me


One woman’s journey after she learned The Cosby Show was based on her family in the 1980s.

By Ann-Marie Adams, Ph.D.  | @annmarieadams

What if I told you that The Cosby Show was partly based on me and my family? You would probably not believe it. But it is true.

That’s the conclusion after a seven-year investigation by private investigators and government officials, who want to remain anonymous. Providence guided us during this lengthy investigation, while I was being prepped in 2014 to run for Congress against former Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty.

This fortuitous story began when former President Ronald Reagan visited Jamaica on April 7, 1982. I am aware that during that one-day visit, Reagan’s security detail reportedly made contact with me and my family. My father was a electrical engineer while working at the Government Printing Office. He owned a home in a suburb of Kingston. And my mother worked with a transportation company.

In Jamaica, we were a middle-class family Reagan’s cabinet allegedly felt they should watch. After Regan’s visit, several individuals made plans to put a family sitcom together and it was called The Cosby Show, according to sources close to the U.S. federal, state and local government.  The show aired on NBC from 1984 to 1992.

The Cosby Show’s character, Denise Huxtable, was based on Ann-Marie Adams.

Bill Cosby first pitched the show about a working-class Honduran family. My father’s ancestors are from Honduras. We had a wonderful life that included Sunday dinners and picnics in the park; but we weren’t immune to obstacles. Although The Cosby Show was mainly focused on Cosby’s observations of family life, some of those observations were of my family, I’m told.

Ann-Marie Adams was brought to America in 1987.
Adams’s father

Cosby also stated in previous interviews the original conceptualization of the show: a working-class family that raised a successful child. (side note: Cosby’s wife suggested the show be based on a well-to do family). The original premise and casting choices for the sitcom, however, reaffirmed the initial concept in the pitch that was identical to my family and me.

So I’m telling my story.

Several scenes were points of recognition in my family’s life in Jamaica and the U.S. I also learned during the investigation that the casting directors and writers had our family in mind when they cast the characters. There are frighteningly similar traits in my family and the characters on the show. And a picture of The Cosby Show family and my family bear a striking resemblance. For example, Denise Huxtable has similar traits to me. Theo is based on my brother, Errol. Vanessa is based on my sister, Andrea. Rudy is based on my niece Janel. And Olivia is based on my other niece, Franchista.

Other similarities include Sondra who shares traits with my cousin Carleen. Elvin is based on my brother Lloyd. And Aunt Vi is based on my cousin, Doreen, Lt. Martin Kindall, Denise’s husband is based on my cousin, Raymond. And of course, Claire Huxtable is based on my mother and older sister, Marcia. The patriarch of the television family, Cliff Huxtable has similar traits as my father–who with a stern hand gave sage advice to his children: “Can’t? What’s that? There’s no such thing as can’t,” he would say.

Denise Huxtable and Heatcliff Huxtable as played on The Bill Cosby Show

In addition to those facts, several scenes were premised off the interpersonal dynamics of the relationships between me and my sisters, brothers and cousins. This was too much of a coincidence to those who were investigating us during the recent investigation and prep for Congress. The public must know that The Cosby Show itself is a creation by several actors, comediennes, writers and producers who are unfamiliar with our family, except a few undisclosed individuals. So the very idea that it was based on another family such as mine was plausible.

Why we were picked for this social experiment will perhaps remain a secret to Reagan, his staff and others. The United States Secret Service has disallowed open documentation of Reagan’s visit to Jamaica in 1982. But one thing was clear. After this revelation to me while I was covering the Obama White House, my family and I were the victim of a hate crime.

This insidious plot to strip us of our resources as a middle-class family, hide our true identities and our impact on the show must be addressed. The Bill Cosby trial in Philadelphia was perhaps divine justice when he was indicted on a day close to my father’s birthday.  Also, Cosby failed to acknowledge our contributions to the show and as a result, his new family comedy slated for 2015 was canceled. We are owed more than an apology.

We are asking for the perpetrators of this crime to be held accountable for the evil and covert attack on our family to cover up this truth in the country.

Enough is enough. We want restorative justice.

Dr. Ann-Marie Adams is an award-winning journalist and U.S. History Professor. She is also the founder of The Hartford Guardian. Previously, she was a journalist at The Hartford Courant, People Magazine, NBC4 New York, the Washington Post and other regional publications.

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Hartford’s First Black Female Mayor Dies


Her Death Was Reported One Year Later

By Ann-Marie Adams, Staff Writer

HARTFORD — Former Hartford Mayor Carrie Saxon-Perry , who was the city’s first black female mayor, died last November. She was 87.

Her death was reported last week by relatives including Richard Howard, one year after she died from a heart attack at a Waterbury Hospital on Nov. 22, 2018.

Carrie Saxon Perry

Saxon Perry was the first African-American woman elected to lead a major city in the Northeast. She was the mayor of Hartford from 1987-93. She succeeded the first black mayor in New England, Thirman Milner but was defeated by former Mayor Mike Peters.

In her 1993 concession speech to Peters, Perry was unapologetic.

“The cornerstones of my administration were equity and justice, a redistribution of resources,” Ms. Perry said in her concession speech. “We have absolutely nothing for which we should be ashamed.”

Perry helped the city’s poor residents, providing social assistance to young single mothers, as she once was. That dedication to community carried over into her political life.

Carrie Saxon Perry on C-spanwww.c-span.org/person/?carrieperry

Born in Hartford on Aug. 30, 1931, Perry was raised in the city and educated in Hartford Public Schools. She left Hartford to attend Howard University.

She returned to Hartford to work as an activist, mainly for anti-poverty and housing organizations and the state welfare department. She then became a state representative in 1980. As state representative in the northwest section of Hartford, she served on posts as assistant majority leader, chair of the bonding subcommittee, and a committee member for education, finance and housing.

Indeed, the former Howard University and community activist used the largely ceremonial role as Hartford’s mayor to address issues such as crime, racial tension, and more.

She also ran for president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People of Greater Hartford but was beaten by Mohammed Ansari.

The NAACP is expected to hold a memorial service to honor Saxon Perry.

“Her legacy has been one of progressive, transparent and people-oriented leadership city of Hartford,” said John Brittain, a lead attorney on the Sheff v. O’Neill school desegregation case and a former neighbor of Saxon Perry.

Perry had a son, four grandchildren, and two great grandchildren.

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Luke Bronin Wins, Council Loses Two


By Hartford Staff

HARTFORD — No surprise here in Hartford. In an overwhelmingly Democratic city, the incumbent Mayor of Hartford Luke Bronin on Tuesday captured 77 percent of the votes in the 2019 mayoral election.

Despite his secured nomination as a favorite of the Democratic Town Committee Chairman Marc DiBella, Bronin campaigned hard, rolling out yard signs, mailers to apartments and houses, and working with social media and television ads.

Bronin gave his victory speech and thanked the other candidates for jumping into the race. This, he said, made the city stronger and put it on the path to financial success.

“We’ve come a long way but we’ve got a lot more work to do. I promise that I will work my heart out every day for our city,” Bronin said in an email soon after the polls closed.

Longtime city council member rJo Winch received a paltry 1.28 percent or 583 votes. And John Gale, also a long-term council member, received an unexpectedly low number of votes with just 3.56 percent or 1,625 votes.

rJo posted on Facebook that she will be using her time now to write two novels and volunteer with the Kiwanis of Hartford Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts.

“So thankful to everyone who came out and exercised their right to vote…. I am grateful to have had the opportunity to serve Hartford for 12 years,” Winch said.

The treasurer Adam Cloud was unchallenged and won 100 percent of the vote.

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin got 30 percent of the total number of votes cast in the previous mayoral race. This year, he received 77 percent. Many residents felt they settled for the status quo.

“People all over the city have been telling me that they feel like their vote doesn’t matter, that things will just keep going, with or without them, ” said Joshua Michtom. “Making sure city council has a strong, unified, activist minority voice is the first step to changing that.”

MAYOR ( Click here for full race results )
Democratic Party Luke Bronin 7,582 (76.53%)
Republican Party James Stanley McCauley 839 (8.47%)
Petitioning Candidate W. Michael Downes 34 (0.34%)
Petitioning Candidate Giselle Gigi Jacobs 143 (1.44%)
Petitioning Candidate Aaron Lewis 57 (0.58%)
Petitioning Candidate Eddie A. Perez 1,218 (12.29%)
Write In Tylon R. Butler 34 (0.34%)


COUNCILPERSON
Democratic Party Thomas TJ Clarke, II 5,510 (12.06%)
Democratic Party Nick Lebron 5,918 (12.95%)
Democratic Party Maly D. Rosado 5,649 (12.36%)
Democratic Party Marilyn E. Rossetti 6,293 (13.77%)
Democratic Party Shirley Surgeon 6,245 (13.67%)
Democratic Party James B. Sanchez 5,899 (12.91%)
Republican Party Theodore T. Cannon 700 (1.53%)
Republican Party Gary Bazzano 1,023 (2.24%)
Working Families Party Wildaliz Bermudez 2,178 (4.77%)
Working Families Party Moise Laurent 1,303 (2.85%)
Working Families Party Joshua Michtom 1,350 (2.95%)
Green Party Mary L. Sanders 488 (1.07%)
Second Chance Party Corey J. Brinson 508 (1.11%)
The Hartford Party John Q. Gale 1,625 (3.56%)
Petitioning Candidate RJO Winch 583 (1.28%)
Petitioning Candidate Suzann L. Beckett 421 (0.92%)

CITY TREASURER
Democratic Party Adam M. Cloud 6,435 (100.00%)


CONSTABLES
Democratic Party Ellen S. Nurse 5,564 23.31%
Democratic Party Mamie M. Bell 5,511 (23.09%)
Democratic Party Radames V. Vazquez 5,449 (22.83%)
Democratic Party Ronnie E. Walker 5,526 (23.15%)
Republican Party Randy Correa 939 (3.93%)
Republican Party Ronald J. Perone 881 (3.69%)



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Some Hartford Residents Accuse Officials of Voter and Ethnic Media Suppression


By Ann-Marie Adams, Staff Writer

HARTFORD — Voting polls opened at 6 a.m. on Tuesday, and Hartford residents trickled into polling stations to cast their ballot for who they think should lead the capital city of Connecticut.

This year’s elections are being held in 165 out of 169 municipalities in the state. In addition, voters will choose mayors, town council members, constables and a treasurer to be local leaders, who have an impact on city issues.

Registering to Vote

You can take part in Election Day registration at a designated location in each town from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

To register in person, you will need to provide proof of identity and residence. Check with your town hall for details on where to go and what you need to bring. You must be registered by 8 p.m. in order to vote, according to the website for the Secretary of the State. 

Secretary of State Denise Merrill said that Connecticut has improved its Election Day cybersecurity systems by installing extra firewalls and expanding virtual oversight of each town’s server.

No formal word yet on how the state is addressing voter suppression in the city of Hartford, which some residents say includes covert operations to undermine voters, removing names from the voter records, physically prohibiting voters from showing up at the polls in the city and other unchecked towns across the state.

Seats Up for Grab

Luke Bronin, the incumbent mayor easily won the Democratic Town Committee’s nomination and the September primary beating out other challengers such as State Rep. Brandon McGee, former Hartford mayor Eddie Perez, media owner J. Stan McCauley, Author and Publisher Aaron Lewis, Union Organizer Michael Downes and Business woman Giselle Gigi Jacobs.  All the candidates wanted to unseat Bronin because, they said, he was not doing a quality job of serving all of the city’s neighborhoods.

In addition, Bronin was accused of media suppression of ethnic publications by working with political operatives—some federal workers—to undermine black journalists.

See ballot here.

There was only one woman in the mayoral race, Jacobs. She spoke about the “divide and conquer” strategy used in the run up to the elections for a majority of the city, which comprises of Latinos, Africans of varied ethnic groups including native born and West Indians, as well as other minorities.

The city council seats that are hotly contested include Row 2A with Thomas “TJ Clark” who was endorsed by the Democratic Party. So was Nick Lebron on Row 3A; Maly D. Rosado on Row 4A; Marilyn E. Rossetti on Row 5A;  Shirley Surgeon on Row 6A; James B. Sanchez on Row 7A.

The council seats facing a challenge are mainly with TJ Clark, who is running against Republican Party candidate, Theodore T. Cannon, Working Families Party Joshua Michtom, Green Party Mary L. Sanders, Second Chance Party Corey J. Brinson, The Hartford Party John Q. Gale, Petitioning candidate and rJo Winch.

The shocker in this election is that Winch, who was always endorsed by the Democratic Party for more than a decade, was not considered a viable candidate, sources said.

Other contested seats include Lebron’s on Row 3A by Republican Party Gary Bazzano and Working Families Party Moise Laurent. Also, petitioning candidate Suzann L. Beckett is also in the running.

Also, Maly D. Rosado on Row 4A is being challenged by Working Families Party Wildaliz Bermudez.

Democrats Shirley Surgeon has no challenger on Row6A and James B. Sanchez, also a Democrat, has no challenger on Row 7B.

On the back of the ballot, Hartford residents have only one choice in who will be treasurer: Adam Cloud, a Democrat.

The four candidates for constables are Ellen S. Nurse, Radames V. Vazquez, Ronnie E. Walker and Mamie M. Bell. The Republican candidates for constables are Randy Correa and Ronald J. Perone.

Election Fraud Alert

The Office of the Secretary of the State and the State Election Enforcement Commission jointly run an Election Day hotline. If voters encounter any problems at a polling place, they should contact the hotline at 866-733-2463 (866-SEEC-INFO) or elections@ct.gov.

Results are also available on the Secretary of the State’s website at portal.ct.gov/sots.

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Voting Begins Today in Hartford


By Ann-Marie Adams, Staff Writer

HARTFORD — Voting polls opened at 6 a.m. on Tuesday, and Hartford residents trickled into polling stations to cast their ballot for who they think should lead the capital city of Connecticut.

This year’s elections are being held in 165 out of 169 municipalities in the state. In addition, voters will choose mayors, town council members, constables and a treasurer to be local leaders who have an impact on city issues.

Registering to Vote

You can take part in Election Day registration at a designated location in each town from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

To register in person, you will need to provide proof of identity and residence. Check with your town hall for details on where to go and what you need to bring. You must be registered by 8 p.m. in order to vote, according to the website for the Secretary of the State. 

Secretary of State Denise Merrill said that Connecticut has improved its Election Day cybersecurity systems by installing extra firewalls and expanding virtual oversight of each town’s server.

No formal word yet on how the state is addressing voter suppression in the city of Hartford, which some residents say includes covert operations to undermine voters, removing names from the voter records, physically prohibiting voters from showing up at the polls in the city and other unchecked towns across the state.

Seats Up for Grab

Luke Bronin, the incumbent mayor easily won the Democratic Town Committee’s nomination and the September primary beating out other challengers such as State Rep. Brandon McGee, former Hartford mayor Eddie Perez, media owner J. Stan McCauley, Author and Publisher Aaron Lewis, Union Organizer Michael Downes and Business woman Giselle Gigi Jacobs.  All the candidates wanted to unseat Bronin because, they said, he was not doing a quality job of serving all of the city’s neighborhoods.

In addition, Bronin was accused of media suppression of ethnic publications by working with political operatives—some federal workers—to undermine black journalists.

See ballot here.

There was only one woman in the mayoral race, Jacobs. She spoke about the “divide and conquer” strategy used in the run up to the elections for a majority of the city, which comprises of Latinos, Africans of varied ethnic groups including native born and West Indians, as well as other minorities.

The city council seats that are hotly contested include Row 2A with Thomas “TJ Clark” who was endorsed by the Democratic Party. So was Nick Lebron on Row 3A; Maly D. Rosado on Row 4A; Marilyn E. Rossetti on Row 5A;  Shirley Surgeon on Row 6A; James B. Sanchez on Row 7A.

The council seats facing a challenge are mainly with TJ Clark, who is running against Republican Party candidate, Theodore T. Cannon, Working Families Party Joshua Michtom, Green Party Mary L. Sanders, Second Chance Party Corey J. Brinson, The Hartford Party John Q. Gale, Petitioning candidate and rJo Winch.

The shocker in this election is that Winch, who was always endorsed by the Democratic Party for more than a decade, was not considered a viable candidate, sources said.

Other contested seats include Lebron’s on Row 3A by Republican Party Gary Bazzano and Working Families Party Moise Laurent. Also, petitioning candidate Suzann L. Beckett is also in the running.

Also, Maly D. Rosado on Row 4A is being challenged by Working Families Party Wildaliz Bermudez.

Democrats Shirley Surgeon has no challenger on Row6A and James B. Sanchez, also a Democrat, has no challenger on Row 7B.

On the back of the ballot, Hartford residents have only one choice in who will be treasurer: Adam Cloud, a Democrat.

The four candidates for constables are Ellen S. Nurse, Radames V. Vazquez, Ronnie E. Walker and Mamie M. Bell. The Republican candidates for constables are Randy Correa and Ronald J. Perone.

Election Fraud Alert

The Office of the Secretary of the State and the State Election Enforcement Commission jointly run an Election Day hotline. If voters encounter any problems at a polling place, they should contact the hotline at 866-733-2463 (866-SEEC-INFO) or elections@ct.gov.

Results are also available on the Secretary of the State’s website at portal.ct.gov/sots.

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Hartford Guardian Begins Fall Fundraising


HARTFORD — Starting Nov. 1, The Hartford Guardian will launch its fall 2019 fundraising drive to raise $20,000 by the end of the year.

Since its founding in 2004, The Hartford Guardian has prioritized transparency and integrity in its reporting. The online publication exists to build communities by doing quality journalism to cover every neighborhood in the city of Hartford and we put accountability at the forefront.  

The staff and volunteers of The Hartford Guardian believe this is the type of journalism that cannot wait.

That’s why we’re excited to share an opportunity to DOUBLE YOUR DONATION this year. We have been selected to participate in NewsMatch, a national matching-gift campaign that drives donations to nonprofit newsrooms around the country.

Last year alone, NewsMatch helped raise more than $7.6 million for 154 news organizations in 42 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico.   

Here’s how it works.   

STARTING NOW — THROUGH DECEMBER 31 — NEWSMATCH WILL MATCH YOUR NEW MONTHLY DONATION 12X OR DOUBLE YOUR ONE-TIME GIFT, ALL UP TO $1,000.

Visit the www.thehartfordguardian.com

WE CAN EARN UP TO $20,000 IN MATCHING DOLLARS, WHICH MEANS THE HARTFORD GUARDIAN CAN RAISE $40,000 IN TOTAL.

For a nonprofit like us, the staff say, this is a big deal and will help us deliver the kind of innovative journalism you’ve come to expect, every day.

Donations from readers like you enable The Hartford Guardian to deliver high-quality journalism that challenges conventional wisdom and investigate issues that impact our communities.

Donate Now

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Police ID Resident Hit By Car


HARTFORD — Police are still investigating a hit and run accident that left a 71-year-old grandmother dead after she was on her way to the grocery store.

The woman was killed when she was hit by a car fleeing the scene of a shooting last Thursday afternoon.

The incident occurred around 2 p.m. at Garden and Westland streets. One car was parked when another pulled up. The passengers in the cars began arguing and it led to gunfire being exchanged, WTNH 8 reported.

When one of the cars attempted to flee the scene, the driver backed up, hitting the woman, who was identified as Yvonne Smith. One of the cars then crashed into a building a few blocks from the shooting scene.

Smith, who was going to the store to get bread and milk when she was struck and killed, was considered a “grandmother of the neighborhood” who cared about her community. Her daughter, Bridget Smith, told WTNH that her mother was a “really good person, she could make you laugh.”

A 16-year-old suspect was remanded to the Juvenile Detention Center and charged with first-degree manslaughter, evading responsibility resulting in death, and second-degree larceny. Police said those charges may be upgraded.

Investigation into the crime is ongoing.


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Kids in the Hall’S Star Kevin McDonald Comes to Hartford


HARTFORD — Wanna learn about theater? Learn from the Kid’s in the Hall’s star, Kevin McDonald. Then watch his show. All shows take place at the Sea Tea Comedy Theater, 15 Asylum Street, Hartford, CTGet your show tickets here. The Kevin McDonald master class takes place at Sea Tea Improv Studios, 75 Pratt Street, Hartford, CTRegister for the workshop here.

Saturday, November 2nd at 7:00 PM

Kevin Cheaters in Love is Kevin McDonald’s rock opera about love, cheating, New York & the 90s. And it’s funny. And Kevin sings!

Oh, that’s a bad thing. But Kevin will be joined by several fellow performers who can sing, along with live musical accompaniment, and that’s a good thing.

Stand-Up, Sketch and Improv with Kevin McDonald

Sunday, November 3rd at 7:00 PM

Tickets are just $20 for this big comedy show featuring stand-up artist by Kevin McDonald. Seating is limited!

Kevin McDonald Workshop

Don’t miss this chance to learn from one of the best, right here in Hartford!

Saturday 11/2 Workshop

10:00 am to 5:30 pm with a one-hour break for lunch

Bring a script for a sketch: Each student for this workshop will come in Saturday morning with a script of one comedy sketch that they have written. (Important: your sketch should be one that works for stage only — please do not bring in a sketch that’s meant to be filmed.)

Bring copies for all roles + 2: Bring enough copies of your sketch for people to read the scripts out loud. For example – if the sketch has 4 members in the cast, you should bring 6 copies. Four scripts for each cast member, one for someone to read stage directions and one for Kevin. If you have a sketch with 5 parts in it, you should bring 7 copies. If there are only 2 actors in the sketch, you should bring 4 copies, etc.

Bring a laptop / notepad & pen: Students will edit and re-write their sketches.

Sunday 11/3 Workshop (2-Day Students Only)
10:00 am to 5:30 pm with a one-hour break for lunch

Learn Sketch Comedy Acting: On Sunday morning, Kevin will talk more about sketch comedy but this time, about acting and not writing.

Rehearse with Kevin as Director: The class will start rehearsing the scenes, one by one with Kevin directing. (When rehearsing, students can read the scripts from their phones — the goal will be to memorize by the show that night.)

Collaborate: Everyone who isn’t in the scene that is being rehearsed will be watching and providing feedback. Everyone helps re-write, rehearse and work on all the sketches. We are creating and producing a sketch show, together. Everyone will be in 1 to 3 sketches. At the end of the day, Kevin & students do sort of a dress rehearsal in preparation to perform the sketches in the show, that night.

Sunday 11/3 Performance! (2-Day Students Only)
7:00 pm
A big show featuring stand-up comedy by Kevin McDonald, sketch comedy by & featuring the 2-day students, and an improv show with Kevin McDonald!
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For more information visit www.seateaimprov.com or call 860-578-4832.

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