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State Rep. Brandon McGee Launches Campaign for Mayor


By Fran Wilson, Staff Writer

HARTFORD — Hartford State Rep. Brandon McGee on Monday announced his candidacy for mayor.

The Hartford native kicked off his campaign on Barbour Street, calling for a united city of different enclaves pitted against each other.

McGee, 34, was recently elected to serve a fourth term as a two-town representative in the General Assembly. His district includes parts of Windsor and Hartford. He said his run as mayor is a natural progression from his current position as a legislator because he has fought for education equity, fair housing and blight remediation.

He said he wants to tackle inequalities and spur economic development in neighborhoods, not just downtown Hartford.

“I want to create a city that embraces each and every resident and creates the conditions for them to succeed,” McGee said.

McGee currently serves as the chairman of the Black and Puerto Rican Caucus. A Democrat, his bid for City Hall comes one week after Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin announced his reelection campaign.

Both McGee and Bronin will face other challengers in the Sept. 10 primary. So far, Hartford Board of Education Chairman Craig Stallings,  local television businessman J. Stan McCauley and an educator Aaron Lewis have filed papers to run for mayor. The general election is Nov. 5.

McGee currently chairs the housing committee and the Black and Puerto Rican Caucus.

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State Rep Brandon McGee Faces Challenger


HARTFORD — The 5th Assembly District State Rep. Brandon McGee will face off his challenger Lawrence Jaggon at a forum on Tuesday at Hartford Public Library.

The event will begin at 5:30 p.m.

The fifth district includes parts of Hartford and Windsor.

McGee, 34, was first elected in 2012. He is a marketing and communications coordinator at Capitol Region Education Council.  McGee failed to get an endorsement of the 5th Assembly District Convention in May.

Jaggon, 55,  is a registered nurse at Community Health Services, and he is the endorsed Democratic candidate. Jaggon is an alternate on the Windsor Planning and Zoning Commission since 2013.

The democratic primary is set for Aug. 14.

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Blue Earth Compost to Unveil CT’s First Food Scrap Truck


By Fran Wilson, Staff Writer

HARTFORD — Elected officials will help unveil Connecticut’s first food scrap dump truck on Wednesday in Hartford.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, Rep. Matthew Ritter, Rep. Brandon McGee and Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin will join the owner of Blue Earth Compost to highlight the company’s first commercial food scrap collection truck.

The ribbon-cutting ceremony will begin 1:00 p.m. at the State Capitol.

The truck is the first of its kind in the state, according to representatives from Blue Earth Compost. The purchase of the truck was made possible with a loan from the Department of Economic and Community Development and matching donations received through crowd sourcing.

Blue Earth Compost, which picks up compostable materials from homes, businesses, and events, and delivers compost in return, is now positioned to be the largest diverter of food scraps in Connecticut, representatives said.

“This truck is the result of a supportive community that cares about our planet and values the principles of environmental justice,” said Alexander Williams, owner of Blue Earth Compost. “At Blue Earth, we are working to change the present waste hauling paradigm, towards one that values the health and safety of our Earth and all communities in our state.”

Of the state’s 2.5 million tons of trash produced each year, about 500,000 tons is food scraps. This represents the single largest component of solid waste sent to incinerators and landfills.

Hartford is host to the Mid Connecticut trash plant, which burns more than 40 percent of the state’s waste. The environment gets polluted from the burning and affects low-income, minority communities, producing one of the highest rates of asthma in the nation.

Blue Earth is offering an environment friendly way of scrapping trash as well as meeting the state’s ambitious recycling goal of diverting 60 percent of municipal solid waste through reductions, reuse, recycling and composting by 2024.

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Legislative Caucus Urges Residents to Participate in Forum


HARTFORD — The Black and Puerto Rican Caucus is urging Greater Hartford residents to participate in a public forum to address general issues facing thier communities.

The forum will be on Feb. 19 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. in Room 2C of the Legislative Office Building in Hartford.

People who wish to speak must sign up the day of the forum from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the LOB lobby. Speakers will be allowed three minutes. Written testimony may be submitted in advance to Georgette.Cicero@cga.ct.gov .

“We need direct input from the public, advocates and other lawmakers about their concerns and ideas about issues affecting Black and Latino communities across Connecticut,” said Chair of the Caucus, Rep. Brandon McGee.

Participation is crucial, officials said.

“The caucus plays a very important role in shaping major policy initiatives, and I am looking forward to advocating and leading legislation that in the long run will benefit all people of Connecticut,” said Rep. Geraldo Reyes, (D-Waterbury) caucus vice chair.

More information may be obtained by sending an email toGeorgette.Cicero@cga.ct.gov  or by calling (860) 240-8323.

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A Push to End Housing Discrimination Against Ex-Offenders


By Mark Pazniokas, ctmirror.org

HARTFORD — As Connecticut’s prison population shows signs of stabilizing after years of shrinking, the General Assembly and administration of Gov. Ned Lamont are tackling new ways of lowering recidivism, including a push outlined Wednesday to discourage housing authorities and other landlords from barring ex-offenders as tenants.

A working group of the legislature’s Commission on Equity and
Opportunity released a 30-page report  that identifies restrictive
housing policies and a lack of re-entry support as obstacles to
Connecticut continuing to lower recidivism and shrink its prison
population.

“Up to 95 percent of people who have been incarcerated in Connecticut will return to our communities one day,”  the report says. “Having a safe and stable place to live is essential for their successful reintegration. Research shows that if a person has stable housing, they are less likely to commit a new crime and end up back behind bars.”

Rep. Brandon McGee Jr., D-Hartford, the co-chair of the legislature’s Housing Committee, said legislation is being drafted based on the working group’s recommendations, as well as proposed directives for the state Department of Housing.

“Today starts the real work,” McGee said.

The report was released at a two-hour workshop at the State Capitol, where the participants include two new players in the state’s criminal justice reform movement: Correction Commissioner-designate Rollin Cook and Marc Pelka, the criminal-justice policy adviser to Gov. Ned Lamont.

Lamont, who was downstate, canceled a planned appearance at the
workshop, but his chief of staff, Ryan Drajewicz, told the group Lamont was intent on continuing and building on the criminal justice reforms of Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, a leader in the national bipartisan movement to reassess sentencing policies that have given the U.S. the highest rate of incarceration in the world.

His hiring of Cook and Pelka, who both have reputations as reformers, is seen as evidence of Lamont’s commitment, but McGee warned that the administration ultimately will be judged on what it delivers in resources and policies.

“We’re all in on this,” said Cook, whose references include Scott
Semple, the man he is succeeding as commissioner.

The workshop was Cook’s first opportunity to meet with a broad audience of community-service providers and policy makers. Cook, who comes from Utah, said he was attracted to the Connecticut job by what he sees as a commitment to progress.

He also noted that the profession as a whole was changing rapidly

“The thing that I’ve seen in corrections over the years is we’ve
changed.  Many people comment on my size,” said Cook, who has the frame of an offensive lineman. “The reality was when I was hired as a correction officer, I was hired for size and athletic ability. They didn’t ask if I could think. They didn’t ask if I could communicate. They didn’t ask if I could problem-solve. They didn’t ask if I was empathetic or anything like that. The world is changing in corrections.”

Connecticut is generally credited with making great strides in making prisons more therapeutic than punitive under Malloy and Semple, who recently retired as the correction commissioner. But community-service providers complain the state still could do much better in preparing inmates for release.

Nearly 11,000 men and women were released from prison from August 2017 through July 2018, with more than 6,000 leaving though parole or some other discretionary release. They typically had some continuing help in finding housing and employment. But 4,677 served their full sentences and left prison without supervision — and in many cases, without support.

Stable housing is crucial to finding and keeping a job, and steady work is one of the best ways to keep ex-offenders from returning to crime, researchers say.

“We don’t want anyone released into homelessness,” said Sarah Diamond, a researcher. “That shouldn’t happen.”

The report concluded that Connecticut has no unified system for tracking the housing status of everyone newly released from jail or prison, particularly those individuals who are released at the end of their sentence.

The working group recommends that the state Department of Housing revise policies that discourage or even bar families getting rental or other housing assistance from welcoming home a relative after a prison term. Parole officers should no longer reject public housing or Section 8 addresses as part of a release plan.

It also recommends legislation banning property owners from looking at criminal records beyond seven years and another bill that would automatically seal all or most convictions after seven years of a person’s release from prison.

The group urges that the sex offender registry be refined to focus on those judged as a danger by a formal risk-assessment system.

“In Connecticut, our sex offender registry is not an indication of risk
or danger to the community, and does not take risk assessment into
account at all,” the report said.

A state recidivism study in 2017 found that within five years of leaving prison, only 4.1 percent were arrested for a new sexual offense.

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Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin Launches Reelection Bid, Cites Progress


By Ann-Marie Adams, Staff Writer

HARTFORD — Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin wants a second term in office.

On Tuesday, he and his supporters stood on the steps of Hartford City Hall and launched a reelection campaign, touting accomplishments since 2016.

Since Bronin entered office, he has tackled the city’s budget, moving the city from the brink of bankruptcy to what he calls stability. He negotiated with the state and received a $550 million bailout and a five-year financial plan, which averted bankruptcy. In return, Hartford officials ceded some power to run the city.

He has also followed up on his promise to address blight. So far, he hired a full-time blight director who runs a blight remediation team that has revitalized 137 buildings.

And he is not done yet.

“We’ve got lots of work left to do. But we’ve got momentum and can’t afford to slow down now,” Bronin said.

Bronin, 39, will face Stan McCauley who launched his bid in November 2018, and Aaron Lewis who launched in December. 2018. Also rumored to run are State Rep. Brandon McGee and State Sen. Doug McCrory.

Bronin is vulnerable in his run for mayor, though. That’s because two years after he entered office, he launched a bid for governor. He was widely criticized by his opponents and encouraged by his supporters.

He also wrestled with the unions over concessions, leaving some dissatisfied. And some residents have complained about garbage and rodent problems that consume the city.

The challenges remain and Bronin said he has his performance in the last three years to build on.

“With crisis behind us, we’re going to focus relentlessly on those basic quality of life issues that matter in every neighborhood,” Bronin said. “But we have a path, and we have a plan. And I’m asking for your help to keep Hartford moving.

Bronin, who served as the legal counsel to former Governor Dannel P. Malloy, raised almost $1 million during his first bid for public office. He defeated the incumbent Mayor Pedro Segarra.

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Hartford Democratic Incumbents Win Races


HARTFORD — Democratic incumbents easily trounced challengers in thier quest to return to the General Assembly.

Incumbent Sen. John Fonfara, a Democrat who represents Senate District 1, easily won his seat over Republican Challenger Barbara Rhue and Green Party Challenger Barbara Barry. Fonfara garnered 10,860 votes over Rhue’s 1,945 and Barry’s 259.

Incumbent Sen. Doug McCory ran unopposed.

Democratic Reps. Matt Ritter and Minnie Gonzalez, both of whom ran unopposed, will return to the General Assembly to represent District 1 and District 3 respectively.

Rep. Julio Concepcion in District 4 beat his challengers Republican Bryan Nelson, and Working Families candidate Kennard Ray. Concepcion garnered 2,659 votes over Nelson’s 330 and Ray’s 309. Mary Sanders of the Green Party garnered 57 votes.

District 5 Rep. Brandon McGee beat Republican candidate Charles Jackson. McGee captured 6,474 votes over Jackson’s 1,144.

Democratic State Rep. Edwin Vargas beat Republican challenger Michael Barlowski. Vargas of District 6 had 3,368 votes over Barlowski’s 485.

District 7 State Rep. Joshua Hall beat Giselle Jacobs, who was a petitioning candidate. Hall captured 3,742 votes over Jacobs’ 92.

Check back for updates.

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Hartford State Senator and State Rep Candidates to Meet


HARTFORD — Candidates for State Senator and State Representative in Hartford will meet at an interactive forum on Oct. 18 at the Hartford Public Library.

They will meet and talk with Hartford residents in small groups about how they will represent the people of Hartford in the State Legislature and what issues are most
important to them, the neighborhood, and the Hartford community.

All candidates who will be on the Nov. 6 ballot have been invited. The interactive forum will begin at 5:30 p.m.

Incumbent Senator John Fonfara, a Democrat who represents Senate District 1, faces Republican Challenger Barbara Rhue and Green Party Challenger Barbara Barry.

Incumbent Senator Doug McCrory is unopposed.

Incumbent State Representatives and their challengers are also invited. They include Matt Ritter, Minnie Gonzalez, Julio Concepcion, Bryan Nelson, Kennard Rey, Mary Sanders, Brandon McGee, Charles Jackson, Edwin Vargas, Michael Barlowski, Joshua Hall and Giselle Jacobs.

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Health care, wage issues top minority caucus agenda


HARTFORD — Pay equity, a “liveable” wage and protecting women’s health care topped a list of priorities unveiled Monday by the General Assembly’s Black and Puerto Rican Caucus.

And while the agenda does not propose specific tax hikes, the 24-member caucus does back several revenue-raisers to fund critical services, according to its chairman, Rep. Christopher Rosario, D-Bridgeport.

“Supporting our middle-class families and creating opportunities for everyone is something we fully support as a group,” he said.

A state panel recently proposed boosting Connecticut’s minimum wage to $15 per hour, while the House and Senate Democratic caucuses and Gov. Dannel P. Malloy have called for the legislature to reduce the gender pay-equity gap this year.

Other priorities on the Black and Puerto Rican Caucus’s agenda include:

  • Securing support for displaced families from Puerto Rico and providing disaster assistance to citizens who have relocated to Connecticut.
  • Addressing mistreatment of inmates and providing quality healthcare, including treatment for opioid addiction, in all Connecticut prisons.
  • Facilitating recruitment and retention of minority teachers.
  • And continuing to promote workforce development.

“These priorities build on work we’ve previously done and reflect issues raised by our constituents,” said Rep. Brandon McGee, D-Hartford, the caucus’s vice chairman. “From criminal justice reform to economic justice measures like earned family and medical leave, these issues disproportionately affect Black and Latino communities.”

Several of these priorities, particularly those involving healthcare, would require millions of dollars in funding.

Caucus members noted, for example, that the new state budget adopted last October tightened eligibility requirements for subsidized health care through the Husky program for poor adults, removing about 9,500 people from the rolls. Reversing this cut would cost about $11.3 million per year.

Rosario said even though revenue proposals aren’t on the agenda, most caucus members consistently support raising income tax rates on the wealthy. Other revenue-raising options include taxing sports betting and recreational marijuana sales.

“Those are options that can definitely be looked at,” he said.

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“The real Olivia Pope” Asked to Run for Congress


Frank Henry, Staff Writer

HARTFORD — “Code Red. Code Red. They’re trying to kill her,” someone shouted as Ann-Marie Adams lie motionless on her bed at the University of Connecticut’s John Dempsey Hospital in 2014.

She had never been admitted to a hospital before April 4, 2014 at about 3 p.m. So the 15-hour wait in the emergency room left her puzzled as she watched and listened to nurses and doctors attend to other patients. At the time of admittance, she was not ill.  And Hartford Police had disrupted her sleep time. They also wasted her prep time for revising a paper to present at the Association for the Study of Connecticut History conference at Fairfield University on the next day.  However, medics thought she should “take precautions” since they were called to the scene on a very significant day in history.

April 4 was a watershed moment in African-American history. It parallels a tragic day in the Civil Rights Movement:  Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn. on April 4, 1968. It was also a sign that local law enforcement agents wanted to suppress another journalist and had hoped to stop similar racial uprisings that spurred the Black Lives Matter movement.

So instead of catching up on sleep that day, Adams was in a conversation with Hartford police officers.

That’s because her sister’s baby sitter called and spoke “jibberish,” according to reports that were later unfounded. While other police officers busied themselves, Adams had a brief conversation with Hartford Police Officer Chris White.

“Being educated can be a dangerous thing,” White said. But it was clear nothing was wrong with Adams, White said. Officers responded to a call that dispatched 15 police officers to her location in the West End of Hartford.

To Adams, that implied it was a crime to read, think and write in the Connecticut.  She later learned that police were trying to suppress uprisings because of a spate of police shootings of unarmed black men across the nation such as Ferguson. And they thought there was a need to “tame the shrew.”

However, law enforcement agencies failed to provide a full explanation for the sudden intrusion into her privacy and were breaking almost every law on the books, sources said. But police officers–on condition of anonymity, said the April 4 incident was because of her writings about race and other matters in the state and federal government. As a result, there have been several attempts to disrupt her businesses and “muck up” her writing.

But after further investigation, police officers  said they discovered Adams true identity: She was brought to Connecticut as an Irish Omen (or prophet) to help America restore its blessings. they also know that Adams was the inspiration for two television shows: The Cosby Show’s Denise Huxtable and the ABC television series, Scandal’s Olivia Pope. Adams is claiming this because law enforcement officials and others, who were told to watch and protect her, spent three years watching her and doing investigations as to why this new revelation about American life and history has not reached the media.

This new revelation was contained because the show was disrupting her life. After the investigation was over in July, she was kidnapped by local terrorists after they discovered her identity. The mass shootings across the country since 2009 are tied to 17 years of disruptions of Adams’s life and career, especially since 2014, officials said.

The most recent disruptions began two days before Christmas 2013, she received a death threat while the Obama administration was communicating with her about her true identity. Days before that, her perfectly fine 10-year-old Hyundai  Sonata stalled suddenly on Interstate 91 after a visit to a car dealer in “Klanchester.” After several suspicious incidents as such on Route 44, she concluded she was in danger. On July 7, 2016, there was another attempt  in Washington, D.C. to disrupt her career–hence the shootings in Florida, sources said.

A lengthy FBI investigation into attempts to suppress her publication and sabotage business relationships morphed into an extension of Sen. Chris Murphy’s 2013 project about how to survive on food stamps for one week. It was seemingly a creative way to injury Adams’s political chances if she chooses to challenge Murphy, U.S. Rep. Elizabeth Esty (D–Conn.) or other elected officials in at least two Congressional districts.  After she was briefed that someone wanted her to run for office, Adams began to explore a bid for the Senate.

“I wasn’t thinking about running for office. But if they’re targeting me this long and hard,  “I have to explore my chances of running and winning,” Adams said.

Adams, 46, is considered an ideal pick to run against Murphy, 43. Her resume and bio has a wealth of Connecticut and Washington,D.C. experience, unlike her possible challenger Murphy when he ran in 2012. Murphy is considered a career politician having served as a State Representative since he was 25 years old. Adams, however, has corporate, nonprofit and academic experience to mount a formidable bid if Connecticut voters are ready for diversity in the Congressional delegation that is all white until Gary Frank ran and won in 1990.  Franks was the first member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Connecticut for one term, 1991 to 1997.  A Republican, he is the only African-American elected to the U.S. Congress from Connecticut’s fifth Congressional district.

Conn. Senator Murphy Takes Food Stamp Challenge

Adams had been covering Gov. Dannel P. Malloy,  Former Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra’s and President Barack Obama’s administrations. She has written several notable commentaries about the state of government and politics. She has taught U.S. History history and journalism at Rutgers and other universities. An award-winning journalist, who has worked for the Hartford Courant, NBC4, News12 Connecticut, Times Herald Record,  Norwich Bulletin and the Washington Post, she takes pride in covering all corners of the state for more than 15 years. Besides media and academic experience, Adams has been involved in the Urban League of Greater Hartford, the West Indian Social Club, Hartford LatinoFest, and other civic organizations and churches.  Adams is a media executive with a legal mind, many observers said.

Dr. Ann-Marie Adams contemplating a run for Congress.

Dr. Ann-Marie Adams asked to run for Congress.

So April 4, 2014 became a turning point for Adams. And the stories that have unfolded after her most recent interaction with ambassadors, politicians, doctors, social workers and nurses prompted her to run for office–hence  a recent press release by others–asking her to run for office. They  said they watched the corruption surfaced during attempts to  suppress her as a journalist and a historian during two critical years in American history: 2014 and 2105. The year 2104 marked the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement and the year 2015 marked the 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act.

Noting the lack of representation for working-class and middle-class residents in Congress, Adams is now exploring a run for the U.S. Senate against Murphy. That’s after witnessing a blatant disregard for the law and a deeper level of corruption in the state while the Obama administration was doing a deep background check on Adams. White House staffers said the White House Correspondent is more inclusive and patriotic than others they have observed.

The sudden switch from academia to politics was thrust upon her. That’s why she is leery about such an offer to run for office, she said.

The move comes as a surprise to many locals. Adams was not thinking of running until she was pushed into a political run by others investigating her. Through them, she discovered her identity as the woman who inspired the character on Scandal.

Adams, who has a multi-ethnic background, was used as a model for the television character Denise Huxtable, who grew up to be “the real Oliver Pope,” according White House staffers. She has an Irish, Jewish, Afro-Portuguese and West Indian  background. Her reach into many communities made Adams a target for several political operatives, who have been sabotaging her work and home life while the show was on the air. They stole clothes, money, shoes, jewelry and other belongings during the unusual and lengthy investigation. Investigators wanted the television series, Scandal, off the air because it disrupted Adams and her family.

The Plot Thickens

Before laying immobile on the bed almost three years ago, Adams felt a sudden and sharp pain in her abdomen. The pain came while she was in the hospital. She was also scheduled to cover President Obama at the National Action Network’s conference, slated as “the largest civil rights convening of the year bringing our nation’s top activists, political strategists and leading academia together to create an action plan for a civil rights agenda.”

She was told she was being held for further evaluation–only to be told later that there was “nothing wrong.” That’s because she’s thin, toned and not on medication. This hospital visit was the first in a series of overt attempts at media suppression and political obstruction, sources said.  Adams later learned that she was being held because several politicians, who see her as a threat to their candidacy for office, didn’t want her to cover certain political events in the state and in Washington, D.C.  Since August 2013 during the debate on Food Stamps and her article about race matters in Connecticut in Ebony.com, congressional leaders and others began to watch Adams.

The obstruction lasted for two years and 10 months and was watched by the United Nations and the Federal Bureau of Investigations after locals gave them a tip that Adams was being obstructed from running for officer because she had one of the best resumes and profile to mount a formidable challenge against Former Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra, Sen. Murphy, State Rep. Doug McCory (D-07), State Rep. Brandon McGee (D-05), State Rep. Minnie Gonzalez (D-03), U.S.  Congressman John Larson (D-01), State Rep. Kevin Witkos (D-04) and U.S. Rep. Elizabeth Esty (D–Conn). Adams, who lives in the 5th Congressional district and owns a business in Hartford, made contact with each representative’s constituent services while other Connecticut residents watched.

The so-called project for Adams morphed into consultations and a tool to keep Adams from covering the White House, sources said. Local residents, who wanted to remain anonymous said they were duped. To date, there are no public arrests, no fixing of the racist political structure and in Connecticut and no money to complete this important project about health reform and how Obamacare was implemented. The project began with the Connecticut Health Foundation’s plan to look at health disparities. It was organized by CHF’s President and CEO Patricia Baker and its Communication Director Maryland Grier. Public Health Commissioner of Health Jewel Mullen was also a part of the project that began before the 2014 election. After a failure to communicate,  the project became a tool to carry out a hate crime.  And a three-year project, which began with Murphy in the 5th Congressional district, was designed to steal Adams’s beauty, money, home and other belongings.

The attempts to cripple Adams physically, mentally, spiritually and emotionally was very detailed, said one source. Using hypnosis, State Troopers and local police officers forced her on trains, in hospitals and on planes to exhaust her income and to be away from several public events.  Adams has shown leadership in the community for almost three decades, some say.  Investigators–some of whom were part of the Secretary of State Hilary Clinton’s 2012 Global Diaspora Forum,  stayed in her life for an unusual length of time to discover 17 characters and at least 50 scenes from the television series: Scandal. The Global Diaspora Forum was an annual celebration of America’s diaspora communities.

Murphy and Food Stamp Challenge passed onto Adams in 2013.

Murphy and Food Stamp Challenge passed onto Adams in 2013.

Local residents who watched the event and “were recruiting” Adams to run sent out a press releases after learning that President  Obama wanted her to run because she is an exemplary citizen and an immigrant who can best represent all residents in the state, sources said. Her multi-ethnic background and her years of service to the community makes Adams and ideal public servant. Adams is an Afro Latino from the West Indies. And her Irish ancestors are allegedly linked to Queen Elizabeth I.

Adams is also the Harriet Algier for the 21st Century, White House staffers said. That’s why locals and others wanted Adams to run for elected office.

Check back for updates for a list of suspects and arrests for this hate crime that emerged after the 2012 GDF at the State Department in Washington, D.C.

 

Read Dr. Ann-Marie Adams’s articles that prompted this story and Murphy’s Food Stamp project:

Connecticut Still Waiting for Superman

Hartford Unveils Journalism and Media Academy

Ebony.com: Chappelle Incident Shatters Silence on Connecticut Racism

 

 

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