Archive | December, 2017

Cities Announce Protocol for Warming Centers


STATEWIDE — Bracing for the bitter artic cold coming this week, the state has joined with cities and towns to provide warming centers for those who need shelter.

In Hartford, Mayor Luke Bronin’s office announced its severe weather protocol:

As result of the forecasted long duration of arctic cold conditions that could last into next week, with potentially negative wind chill factors, the State of Connecticut has implemented its severe cold weather protocol to ensure adequate shelter space during the severe cold weather.  The current protocol will be in effect from today, December 26, 2017, until Tuesday, January 2, 2018.

“I urge residents to stay indoors as much as possible to protect themselves against this bitter cold,” said Mayor Bronin. “Severe weather protocol helps ensure anyone who needs warm shelter has access to it.”

List of Daytime Warming Centers

*   Hartford Public Library, Downtown Branch, 500 Main St: Monday – Thursday 9:30 am – 8:00 pm, Friday and Saturday 9:30 am – 5:00 pm, Sunday 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
*   Center Church, 60 Gold St: Wednesday through Sunday 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
*   Hands on Hartford, 45 Church St: Mondays and Tuesdays 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
*   South End Wellness Center, 830 Maple Ave: Monday – Friday 8:30 am – 4:00 pm
*   North End Senior Center, 80 Coventry St: Monday – Friday 9:30 am – 3:00 pm
*   Parkville Senior Center, 11 New Park Ave: Monday – Friday 8:30 am – 3:30 pm
*   Hispanic Health Council, 175 Main St: Monday – Friday 8:30 am – 4:30 pm
*   Hispanic Senior Center, 45 Wadsworth St: Monday – Friday 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

In East Hartford, Mayor Marcia Leclerc issued the city’s cold weather protocol:
The first resources available to the community are the public warming centers offered throughout town. These warming centers are located in the following locations:

The Public Safety Complex Lobby (31 School Street, open 24 hours, 7 days a week) and

The South End Senior Center (70 Canterbury Street, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Monday – Friday).

Additional resources for adequate shelter can also be found by contacting 2-1-1, which is a free informational service offered to anyone in Connecticut regarding shelter, food, housing, child care, after school programs, elder care, crisis intervention, and much more.

All people are welcome to come in and warm up. For more warming center, call 2-1-1.

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“Wine, Jazz, & Song” Returns to Farmington


HARTFORD  — The Sir William Trio and vocalists from Connecticut Choral Artists will offer interpretations of jazz standards, selections from the American songbook and much more this January in Farmington.

CONCORA’s Friends of Bach hosts the 16th edition of Wine, Jazz, & Song on Jan. 20, 2018 from 6-9 p.m. in Porter Memorial Hall, 75 Main St. in Farmington. CONCORA is the region’s first professional choir and is now in its 44th season.

Led by bassist William Stillinger, the Sir William Trio includes James Argiro on piano and Liviu Pop on drums. The Hartford Courant has praised Argiro as “…a strong soloist and a savvy accompanist … regarded by his peers as a craftsman of the first order,” while the Middletown Press lauds Liviu Pop as a “dynamic entertainer, using blues, soul, R&B, and a touch of rock and roll to deliver powerful soul stirring performances.”

The featured vocalists include Salli-Jo Borden, Kenneth Downes, and Jermaine Woodard, Jr. Local audiences who are familiar with these singers as classical vocal soloists will be surprised and delighted to hear their compelling “crossover” performances of jazz standards, blues, and Broadway classics.

Attendees will also enjoy fine wines, plentiful, delectable hors d’oeuvres, a silent wine auction, write-your-own song dedications, and perhaps even a spin around the dance floor, all in a casually elegant atmosphere.

Tickets for this special event are $50 per person, and may be reserved at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/wine-jazz-song-tickets-36912091058 or by contacting the CONCORA office at 860-293-0567 or contact@concora.org. The snow date is Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018, 6-9 pm.

About CONCORA

, the ensemble, under the leadership up Artistic Director Chris Shepard, enjoys an extraordinary reputation for artistic excellence throughout New England. CONCORA’s mission statement – “to perpetuate and perform with excellence choral music of the highest quality for the broadest possible audience” – represents a commitment to the Connecticut community, to artistic excellence, masterful performances, and educational enrichment. More information about CONCORA is available at www.concora.org.

About CONCORA’s Friends of Bach

The Friends of Bach Committee is a volunteer organization whose mission is to enhance and support CONCORA’s highly-regarded annual performances of the music of J.S. Bach. Through a series of events and the donations of individual Bach lovers, the Friends of Bach raise funds to make CONCORA’s Bach performances possible. More information at http://www.concora.org/join-the-friends-of-bach.html.

EVENT DETAILS

WHAT: Wine, Jazz, & Song — An evening of smooth instrumental and vocal jazz, with plentiful food and wine.
WHEN: Saturday, January 20, 2018, 6:00 PM; snow date: Sunday, January 21, 2018, 6:00 PM
WHERE: Porter Memorial, 75 Main Street, Farmington, CT 06032. Plenty of free, off-street parking is available.
WHO: Sir William Trio and CONCORA vocalists

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Hartford to Hold Gun Buyback Program


HARTFORD — Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin has joined other New England mayors to announced a partnership with St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, and other New England physicians and medical professionals a coordinated gun buyback day in their four cities on December 16.

The gun buyback also marks a remembrance of the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, which happened five years ago Thursday.

“I’m proud to join Hartford’s medical community and our Police Department in this regional effort to get guns out of homes safely,” said Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin.  “Gun violence is both a public safety issue and a public health issue, and we’re fortunate to have longstanding partnerships aimed at reducing the number of guns in our community.”

Hartford’s gun buyback will take place between 9 AM – 3 PM on Saturday, Dec. 16 at the Community Renewal Team at 555 Windsor Street in Hartford.

The buyback will provide Stop & Shop gift cards to individuals who turn in an operable firearm. A $200 gift card will be given for an assault rifle; a $100 gift card for a handgun or revolver; and a $25 gift card for the return of a shotgun or rifle. Guns should be unloaded, placed in a clear plastic bag inside a paper bag or box. Guns may be returned anonymously.

The other mayors are  Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh, Worcester Mayor Joseph M. Petty, and Providence Mayor Jorge O. Elorza.

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Stanley and Decker to Move to Hartford


HARTFORD — Stanley Black & Decker is coming to Hartford.

The company announced recently that it plans to build a new facility in the capital city at 1 Constitution Plaza and is expected to employ 50 people.

The global leader will use some of the 23,000 sq foot space to make improvements on their tools and cyber security, officials said. The rest of the space will be to help startup companies in advanced manufacturing grow their businesses.

Stanley Black & Decker’s President and Chief Executive Officer Jim Loree said they have worked closely with the mayor’s office and “are excited to be a part of building a vibrant, strong capital city.”

“With the budget now passed, the hard work can begin to solve some of the state’s structural fiscal challenges and put the state on a more sound economical path.  We cannot lose the sense of urgency and must recognize that the state is at a critical juncture.  As a company founded in New Britain, Connecticut, almost 175 years ago, we have expressed our commitment from a social responsibility perspective to being part of the solution,” Loree said in a statement on Tuesday.

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin said Stanley Black & Decker will help “reinvent manufacturing” right in Hartford:

“We have been in discussions with CEO Jim Loree and senior leaders at Stanley Black & Decker for many months about the possibility of establishing a center of excellence in Hartford, and today’s announcement represents a huge win – not just for Hartford, but for Connecticut.  The launch of the STANLEY+Techstars Additive Manufacturing Accelerator comes just a few months after the launch of the InsurTech Accelerator, a public-private partnership with Hartford’s major insurance companies.  Our goal is to make Hartford a hub for innovation in our region’s core industries – from insurance to healthcare to advanced manufacturing – so that cutting-edge innovation and entrepreneurship happens right here in Connecticut.  I want to thank Jim Loree and Stanley Black & Decker for their commitment to Hartford, and I’m looking forward to working with them as we position Hartford and Connecticut for the next century,” Bronin said in a statement on Tuesday.

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It’s Okay to be Black, Woman and Immigrant


The #JusticeforJazzy movement is akin to the #MeToo movement.

Just ask any black woman who has been the victim of white women and thier rage. Does this mean the #JusticeforJazzy like the #MeToo movement will topple white women, who use their positions in racist institutions to further oppress black women?

editorialbannerthumbThe response to the #JusticeforJazzy movement, which followed the news that a University of Hartford student was charged with criminal mischief after she spread bodily fluids on her roommate’s belongings, will give us that answer. It will also unveil a powder keg that has been evident since Susan B. Anthony and other white suffragists maligned black women activists in the 1920s, some say. That’s because black women are still burdened with the emotional labor to unpack white women’s privilege and to enter an amicable relationship on the job and in school.

The justice for jazzy movement came out of the experience of a University of Hartford student Chennel “Jazzy” Rowe, who learned about the smoldering hate of her roommate, Brianna Rae Brochu. Brochu, 18, was arrested after she admitted to police that she licked her roommate’s utensils and smeared bodily fluids on Rowe’s backpack. Brochu also bragged about her vile acts on Instagram, derisively referring to Rowe as the “Jamaican Barbie” forced out of her assigned room on campus. Rowe was born in Jamaica.

In the video below, Rowe details her discovery of the events that led to the outcry by NAACP leaders and others, who rally outside the West Hartford Police department. They are calling for Brochu to be charged with a hate crime and to let the world know it’s Okay to be black, woman and immigrant.

The case in Hartford Superior Court was continued to Dec. 18. And it should hold Brochu accountable.

VIDEO OF CHENNEL ROWE’S DISCOVERY

 

 

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New Tool Helps Track, Document Rise in Hate Incidents


Since the 2016 election there has been an alarming increase in reports of hate incidents around the country. Reports range from vandalism and hate-fueled graffiti to physical attacks and shootings.

The reports come amid heightened fear and anxiety within immigrant and minority communities, fueled by the rhetoric of the campaign, and by statements and policies from the current administration.

editorialbannerthumbExperts note such fear helps to tamp down reporting of hate crimes, which are already vastly underreported.

Ethnic media have long been attuned to such incidents, particularly when members of their own communities are the victims. NAM has been working with our ethnic media partners to help expand visibility of their reporting on hate crimes and hate-related incidents. You can see that coverage by visiting NAM’s Tracking Hate page.

NAM has also worked to help inform ethnic media on how to report and cover hate-related incidents.

But when it comes to accurately documenting hate, there is in fact no national system in place. The FBI maintains its Uniform Crime Reporting Program which is slow to update and relies on reports from law enforcement agencies that may or – as is often the case – may not report such crimes.

The Southern Poverty Law Center, meanwhile, has operated its own database, though verification of claims by victims, witnesses and the media has been an issue, with some claims having been proven false.

Which is why NAM has joined a national collaborative of media, civil rights groups and tech companies that is working to accurately track and verify reports of hate crimes and incidents of bias or harassment.

The Documenting Hate Project is spearheaded by the not-for-profit news outlet ProPublica, which has created the form below to allow witnesses or victims to come forward and report their experience. Reports will be verified before entering a national database that will be made available, with privacy restrictions, to newsrooms and civil rights organizations across the country. The form is not a report to law enforcement or any government agency.

If you are a member of the ethnic media, we encourage you to upload this form to your own website to allow your audiences the opportunity to come forward should they or someone they know be the victim of a hate crime.

Si usted ha sido víctima de un crimen de odio, por favor utilice este formulario para contribuir a esta base de datos.

如果您曾經遇到或目睹過仇恨罪,您可以使用此工具告訴我們您的故事。

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‘It’s OK to Be White,’ Explained


Based Stickman via Facebook

By Michael Harriot, The Root

Another controversial wypipo movement has reared its ugly head, so we thought we’d—

Hold on for a second. I love these explainers, but now you’re writing them just for the sake of writing them. Why not work on a story about the Libyan slave trade or something? There’s no need to make things up.

I’m not making anything up. There is actually a movement dedicated to telling white people that it’s OK to be white.

By “movement,” do you mean two random people? One of my pet peeves with submillennials is that they call everything a “movement.” As soon as a nigga designs a T-shirt, creates a hashtag or starts a SoundCloud page, he claims something is a movement.

There is no “It’s OK to Be White” movement. I know white people are slowly dissolving into salty puddles of lukewarm snowflakes, but I don’t think they’ve gone this far … yet. There would’ve been sirens or something.

Well, what do you call it when a conservative is hired to give an “It’s OK to Be White” speech at the University of Connecticut? How about the flyers they’ve found at the University of South Carolina, University of California, Davis, Washington State University and a Maryland high school? What would you call it when the guy who invented Minecraft is beefing about it on Twitter?

OK, you got me. It sounds like a movement. But why, though?

That’s what I was about to explain before I was so rudely interrupted. A lot of our best and brightest white people are starting to believe they are oppressed. There have been polls that show that most white people feel they are “under attack” or discriminated against.

Most? Nigga, how?

I’m trying to use that word less often in my writing. I have to get permission to use it. Anyway, there’s a quote that I heard that says, “When you’re accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression.”

That’s deep.

I hate that quote.

READ MORE 

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Hartford Council to Hold Hurricane Fundraiser


HARTFORD — The Hartford City Council will hold a fundraiser event for Caribbean friends, who had to relocate to the city after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico and other Caribbean islands.

The city will hold the event for the Hartford Relief Center at 15 Van Dyke Ave. from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Dec. 9.

Families who have been helped by the relief agency will share their stories, and refreshment will be available.

Interested donors can give to the agency in three ways cash, non perishable food or clothing;  Up to $25,000 in cash will be matched by a private donor.

For more information, call 860-422-7095.helping hand

 

 

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