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Historian to Discuss First Black Female Abolitionist

HARTFORD – June is Caribbean-American Heritage Month. And in celebration of Caribbean-American Heritage Month, Dr. Ann-Marie Adams will hold a discussion about race, gender, and education in Connecticut at the Avon Public Library on June 30.

 
Dr. Adams’ talk entitled Maria Stewart: Alchemy of Race, Gender, and Education in Antebellum Connecticut, will begin at 6 p.m. in the Library’s conference room at 281 Country Club Road in Avon, CT.

 
Adams, a historian and journalist, will also discuss the contours and complexity of the long Civil Rights Movement in Connecticut, which catapulted Maria Stewart to fame in the 1800s. Stewart was the first black, female abolitionist, a contemporary of Frederick Douglass.

 
She was also the first black woman to give a public speech in America.

 
She was also known for giving the first speech before a mixed audience of men and women. In the 1800s it was not proper for women—black and white—to speak before an audience with men.

 
And unbeknown to many, Stewart was from Connecticut.

 
A Caribbean-American, Dr. Adams said she is delighted to share this hidden history with the public.

 

 

Stewart has been heralded by many black feminists, but she does not get the attention of Frederick Douglass or Harriett Tubman.

 
Stewart was born in the West Indies.

 
For more information, call 860-403-0055.

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