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Categorized | Business, Nation

Letter: Tom Foley’s Bold-Face Lie

Dear Editor:

Tom Foley made several inaccurate statements in  recent gubernatorial debate  regarding home care workers and consumers. 

The collective bargaining agreement explicitly states that there will be no harm to consumer budgets and services. Both the public act and collective bargaining agreement state that no consumers shall suffer a reduction in services as a result of collective bargaining.

“Such a misrepresentation by Tom Foley is completely irresponsible.  It is a bold face lie to state that consumers are negatively affected because home care workers won the right to collectively bargain. It is explicitly stated in the public act and the collective bargaining agreement that consumers will not be negatively affected.  By allowing home care workers in Connecticut to collectively bargain we are starting to create a better paid and more stable workforce.  The people of Connecticut deserve the truth from their elected officials and Tom Foley made it clear in today’s debate he is incapable of that.  Both consumers and caregivers are benefited from the actions Governor Malloy and the state legislature took.  Governor Malloy  has helped Connecticut build a stronger workforce to care for the disabled and elderly,” spokesperson Jennifer Schneider said.

“Without my personal caregiver I wouldn’t be able to survive,” Margie Santana a Hartford consumer suffering from multiple sclerosis said.  “Tom Foley is out of touch with what people with disabilities in Connecticut need.  In no way have I been negatively impacted because my home care worker was able to collectively bargain.  Those of us suffering from disabilities  known that Governor Malloy has our best interest and has worked hard to help us have better care.”

The quality of home care that consumers receive can be affected by high turnover of caregivers. Turnover for home care workers ranges from 44 to 65 percent per year.[i]  This high turnover is primarily due to low pay and little to no benefits.

The annual turnover rate of the workforce fell 17 percent and the “bad turnover” rate fell by 30 percent after workers in San Francisco negotiated raises and better benefits, according to a study by the Center for Labor Education and Research at the University of California, Berkeley.[ii]

 

Jennifer Schneider

Communications Director

SEIU 1199, New England

Email us: editor@thehartfordguardian.com
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